Aeronautics

Volume 17 - No. 2 - 1915 July

Table of Contents PDF Document


The American Magazine of Aeronautics was the first commercial magazine in the United States of America about national and international aviation. There were reports on patents and flight contests. The journal was published from July 1907 to July 1915. All pages from the years 1907 to 1915 are available with photos and illustrations as full text, for free.

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VOL. XVII. No. 2

JULY 30, 1915

15 Cents

llBlllil)imiMif^1i- jjgjii^^

EROMilTICS

160 H.P. Model

The output of this model is sold for some weeks to come. Those desiring motors of this type should communicate with the factory at Hammondsport for the necessary arrangements for future deliveries.

All the important American records are held by the Cur-tiss Motor.

Modern factory methods and large facilities have developed Curtiss Motors to the highest degree of efficiency.

Simplicity of design and construction permit overhauling or repairing by any good mechanic, no special knowledge being required.

Light in weight, yet not so light that durability and strength are sacrificed. The factor of safety is large in Curtiss Motors.

We

Curtiss Motor Co.

HAMMONDSPORT NEW YORK

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CHARACTERISTICS OF AMERICAN MOTORS (Aug. 1, 1915)

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pi m

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Rated IIP

No Cyl.

Bore

Stroke

Stated RPM

Stated Lbs.

with All Accessories but without Water, Gas or Oil

 

s

B

IIP by

A.L. A.M. Formula

Wt.

Per Rated

HP (Lbs.)

Cooling

Lbs. Water

Stated BH P

Lbs. Per BMP

Arrangement of Cylinder

Duesenborg. ...

N.B.

-1

4

375

6

 

2220

305

1

.37

30 65

N.B.

W

N.B.

N.B.

N.B.

Vert.

Ouesenberg.....

750

12

6

.75

7

5

1500

2700

1

. 11

21S.77

3 G

W

N.B.

750

3 6

Ve.e

Emerson........

             

Not

given

           

Vert.

t*Fredrickson ....

55

3

4

5

4

75

1250

N.B.

1

05

40. OS

N.B.

A

 

N.B.

N.B.

Radial

t*Fredrickson ....

00

5

4

5

4

75

1250

210

1

05

0(1. S2

2.33

A

 

N.B.

N.B.

Radial

t*Fredricksou ....

ISO

1(1

4

5

4

75

1250

N.B.

1

05

133.04

N.B.

A

 

N.B.

N.B.

Radial

♦Gyro ..........

!I0

7

4

5

6

 

1250

215

1

33

56 7

2 30

A

 

SO

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110

1)

4

5

6

 

1250

270

1

33

72. 9

2.45

A

 

102

2 64

Radial

llall-Scott ......

125

0

5

 

7

 

1300

535

1

40

60 0

4 2S

W

N.B.

125

4.28

Vert.

11 all-Scott.......

SO

s

4

 

5

 

N.B.

200

1

25

51 .2

3 . 62

\v

N.B.

N.B

N.B.

Vee

llall-Scott. . .

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4

 

N.B.

265

0

 

51 2

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w

N.B.

N.B.

N.B.

Vet'

llall-Scott . .

100

s

5

 

5

 

1500

540

0

 

SO

5 4

w

N.B.

145

3.72

Vee

Harrinian ....

30

1

4

25

4

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1000

ISO

0

 

2S 0

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w

22

N.B.

N.B.

Vert.

Harrintan ....

00

1

5

 

5

 

1350

240

0

 

40

4

w

30

N.B.

N.B.

Vert.

ilarriman . . .

100

6

5

 

5

 

1400

355

0

 

00

3 55

\y

40

N.B

N.B.

Vert.

tJohnson . . ...

50

1 5

 

4

 

/1150

20S

 

S

(15

4 10

w

N.B.

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4 10

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29S

 

s

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4

 

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403

 

s

130.

4 03

w

N.B.

100

4 03

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150

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5

 

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35

4 i

4

25

4

5

1150

102

1

05

2s. :.•

5 40

A

 

36

5 33

Vert.

Kemp........

55

0

1

25

4

5

1150

272

1

05

43 3

4 04

A

 

54

5 10

Vert.

The Johnson motor, although it is of the two-cycle type, is different from other two-cvcle motors in that it is controlled by system of cylinder cut-out.

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CHARACTERISTICS OF AMERICAN MOTORS (Aug. 1, 1915)

NAME

*Adams-Farwell. . *Adams-Farwell. .

JAeromariue......

tAcromariue......

Aircraft.........

Ashmusen.

Rated II P

100 165 100

Ashmusen.......! 105

Bates......

Bates.......

Bates.........

Bates.........

Bates.........

Bates.........

Bates (b). . . . Bates (b) . . . 1 Burgess-White.

Curtiss........

Curtiss........

Curtiss........

Curtiss........

Curtiss........

Ouesenberg

30 40 00 1 10 135 110 ISO 120 1(50

0O 90 100 100 75

85

           

Stated Lbs.

                       
           

with All

   

11 P

by

Wt.

           
           

Accessories

 

s

A.

L.

I

er

Cool-

Lbs.

Stated

Lbs.

Arrange-

No.

Boi

Stroke

Stated

but with-

   

A.M.

R (ted

ing

Water

BHP

V

er

ment of

Cyl.

       

RPM

out Water

 

B

Formula

1

i.

     

BUP

Cylinders

           

Gas or Oil

       

(Lbs.)

         

5

6

 

6

 

1200

205

0

 

72

 

4

09

A

 

N.B.

N

11.

Radial

0

6

 

6

 

1200

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0

 

S(i

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2

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A

 

N 11.

N B.

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N.B.

N.B.

N

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N.B.

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N

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4

3125

5

125

2000

435

1

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14

6

4

35

W

35

100

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given

                 

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given

                 

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3

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5

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1600

330

1

14

44

2

3

00

W

N.B.

ss

3

75

Vert.

6

4

75

5

5

1500

300

1

15

54

2

3

07

W

N.B.

1 14

3

15

Vert.

6

5

25

0

 

1550

450

1

14

60

4

3

33

W

N.B.

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Vert.

S

4

.5

5

 

1550

340

1

1 1

64

s

3

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W

N.B.

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5

25

6

 

1600

560

1

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2

3

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W

N.B.

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6

5

25

6

 

1600

350

1

14

60

4

2

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A

N.B.

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16

3

125

5

5

2000

575

1

76

02

5

3

50

A

 

Not

ready

Dble. V.

0

4

 

5

 

1200

2S5

1

25

3S

4

4

70

W

30

N.B.

N.B.

Vert.

s

4

 

5

 

1200

325

1

25

51

2

3

61

W

30

N.B.

N

B.

Vee

s

5

 

7

 

1100

700

1

40

so

0

4

37

W

SO

N.B.

N.B.

Vee

s

4

.25

5

 

1250

340

1

17

57

S

3

40

W

30

N.B.

N.B.

Vee

s

4

 

5

 

1 100

300

1

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51

2

4

 

W

30

N.B.

N.B.

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6

 

2220

365

1

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25

4

4

3

W

N.B.

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4

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Vert.

= Rotative. t "= Two-cycle H.P. is figured A.L.A.M. rating times 1.05. J = Geared. Propeller rnns 1150

r.p.ni. to 1200 r.p.m. W = Water. A = Air. Weights of air cooled motors are for plants readv to flv. Water

weighs (j.j.5 lbs. per cubic fool; 1 gallon = S.355 lbs. N.B. = Information asked and not given. a "= Not' including

radiator. Ibi Last two models not vet completed.

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Published senii-mnnthly in the best interests of Aeronautics by AERONAUTICS PRESS INC. 250 West 54th St.. New York

Telephone. Circle 22S9 Cable. Aeronautics. New Yzjrk

ERNEST L. JONES Editor

M. B. SELLERS Technical Editor HARRY SCHULTZ Model Editor

Entered as Second Class Mail Matter. September 22, 190S. under the Act of March 3. 1879. $3.00 a year. 15 cents a copy.

Postage free in the United States. Hawaii, the Philippines and Porto Rico. 25 cedts extra for Canada and Mexico. 50 Cents extra for all other countries.

Make all checks and money orders free of exchange and payable to AEKO NAUTICS PRESS.

The magazine is issued on the 15th and 30th of each month. All copy must be received 6 days before date of publication. If prool is to be shown, allow ance must be made for receipt and return.

Subscribers will kindly notify this office if discontinuance is desired at tbe end of their subscription period, otherwise it will be assumed tbat their subscription is to be continued.

THE AEROPLANE POWER-PLANT

By M. WILLIAM EHRLICH, M.E.

(All rights reserved by Author)

As the title indicates, this series of articles will deal with the power plant of an aeroplane, and each chapter will he complete in itself. Different sections will cover the items which tend to produce economy and efficiency as related to aviation. It is a technical treatise 'written in ei'cry-day language. The data embodied is practical from start to finish, with facts and figures given to substantiate almost every statement made, as is shown by the tentative statement of contents, as follows:

Prime Movers; a Comparison—Physical Relation of the Aero Engine to the Aeroplane —Unit Weight and Engine Classification— Motor Power and Installation Requirements —Propellers with Transmission of Power— Economic Selection of Propellers—Fuel Supply and Carburction—Ignition, Lubrication and Cooling—Gasoline, Oil and Water Requirements—Motor Rating and Developed Capacity—Disposition and Control of Equipment—Power-Plant Accessories—Four Cycle . lir-coolcd Motors—Four Cycle Water-cooled Motors—Two Cycle Motors.

It is admitted almost universally that the power-plant of an aeroplane is certainly its most important feature. Until the perfection of same, the motor remained the "missing Hub" in the solution of mechanical flight.

The author, M. William Ehrlich, is a consulting mechanical engineer and a Junior of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. He has to his credit many useful and practical papers, including such as the "Internal Combustion Engine." "A Trans-Continental Acro-zcay," etc.

The present series on "The Aeroplane Power-plant," the first installment of which appears below, should be of great moment to aviators, designers and manufacturers. Students of aviation certainly cannot afford

to miss them. 11 c arc indeed fortunate in securing this scries, and it is certain that many will find it of great benefit and value. The editor would be glad to-receive readers' comments on same from time to timc^ Incidentally, the publishing of this material emphasizes the fact that Aeronautics is, as always, the leading aeronautic magazine in this country, as only authoritative subjects and events are reported in our columns, frequently exclusively.

EDITOR,

CHATTER I. MODERN PRIME MOVERS

BEING A COMPARISON OF INTERNAL ( OMBUSTION ENGINE TYPES; DISCUSSING THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE AERO-MOTOR AND CONSIDERING THE QUESTION OF THE STEAM-ENGINE

It is needless to delve into the practical details attending the accomplishment of human night in mechanically propelled heavier-than-air machines, which are now popularly termed aeroplanes, for many of the early accomplishments, really wonderful achievements, are still fresh in our minds, and as the more recent attainments are so ably recorded in the different journals, these certainly need not

here be quoted. ^Historical accounts of performances are indeed always interesting, but it is riot the scope of this work to repeat that which has already been so well presented in various other forms. The principal aim at this writing is to bring to light the real secret underlying the success of the art of aviation.

The necessary forms of aero-foils or planes and their arrangement were through experiment well tie-

veloped by the close of the nineteenth century. But even at that time it was clearly understood that serious attempts at human flight would prove futile unless an exceptionally light power-producing apparatus could be obtained and utilized for the mechanical propulsion of the flying machine. Thus we see that even at an early date the power-plant was recognized as the missing factor.

As the years progressed the crude classes of self-propelled vehicles brought the modern type of gasoline automobile to the front, and with many detailed improvements added to the rapid development of this form of internal-combustion engine, public favor was soon gained. Now, after a little more than twenty years of existence, man)' refinements have been produced, resulting in a highly .economical means of transportation, both for pleasure and commercial purposes. With the successful utilization of the explosive type of engine in the automobile came the further evolution of reduction in weight, resulting in what is now termed the aeroplane or aero-motor. This is the name to be used throughout these papers to designate the types of gasoline engines used in the practice of aviation. Before proceeding with the numerous details involved in the power plant of an aeroplane, and particularly so with the motor proper, a few explanatory words may not be out of place.

The internal combustion engine, commonly called the gas engine, is a form of prime mover in which the fuel is burned directly in the cylinder of the engine. The gasoline engine, also known in England as the petrol-engine, is so-called because of the fuel used in combustion; but petrol and gasoline are almost identical in their composition. Therefore we see that the internal combustion engine may be classed according to the kind of fuel used, such as gas, oil, gasoline, naphtha, alcohol, kerosene, etc. Whether the fuel be a liquid or a gas, it is always vaporized or forms a gas before actual combustion takes place, thus the various types are properly called "gas" engines.

The extensive use both of the manufacturing apparatus and the automobile type of machine has created a popular distinction, the former being called an engine and classed by the kind of fuel used, and the latter is almost universally called a motor. Therefore it is frequent that we hear it termed the automobile motor and sometimes the auto-engine. This synonymous use may also be found in the practice of motor-boating and aeroplaning. The machine above-mentioned as the "manufacturing" type represents that form of prime-mover now extensively used in large manufacturing and industrial establishments for the production of electricity or other commercial pur-

poses. This form is usually horizontal and of slow speed, from which type the possibilities of the auto-engine were made a reality. The Diesel type of engine is not included in this account.

In the development of the auto-engine, economy in weight and space played as great a part as was similarly but later found necessary for aviation purposes, requiring the reduction of the motor parts and resulting in the production of a high speed engine. Though originally of the vertical type, these motors are now found with various arrangements and numbers of cylinders, both for use in automobiles and aeroplanes, It is an indisputable fact that the high power or modern auto-engine is a highly economic apparatus, but it must be understood that the conditions to be found in aero practice are somewhat unlike those inherent to the automobile.

A more conservative comparison would perhaps be the power plant of a motor boat. In this craft the engine is called on to deliver continuous power for an extensive period of time, conditions also found in aviation. The reason why the automobile is taken as a basis for comparison may be readily accounted for. The duty of the motor-boat engine is to fulfill a severe power demand, and in order to maintain reliability ail the parts are substantially built, resulting in high total weight. l!ut in the auto-engine many refinements have been brought about, both in the methods of construction and the materials used, resulting in a high grade apparatus that is also able to withstand extensive usage and without much reduction in effect. This resulted in a considerable reduction in weight without affecting the power output, for it is not only the design, but the construction of the engine which bears on its power economies. A well designed but poorly built motor will never give satisfactory results.

Therefore it may be readily seen that it is the success of the automobile engine and the progress of that industry in general that allowed for the rapid development of the aeronautical motor, thus making the assumed possibilities of the past, actual realities of today.

It should be remembered that the prototype of the modern motor dates back only 30 years, to 1885, when the first high-speed internal combustion engine was developed under the pate: Is of Gottlieb Daimler. However, prior to this invention, and even before the days of the successful steam railroad, many inventors proposed using the steam engine as a means for propelling carriages, or as they were then called, road-wagons. Developments along this line of thought brought about many successful steam-propelled vehicles, especially so in England, at about 1845. Then

the law interfered with mechanical progress, and put a ban on the use of steam cars by reserving the right of the road exclusively for horse-drawn carriages. On this account the development of steam-driven vehicles came to a standstill.

Rut when the early experimenters with heavier-than-air machines soon realized that human flight by the muscular force of man is out of the question, and decided that mechanical means must be utilized, attention was directed to the production of small steam boilers and quick-steaming generators. The most successful of the early attainments were due, therefore, to the wonderfully light steam engines constructed at the various periods by the different inventors. Approximate figures, given herewith, indicate their accomplishments. The year, name of experimenter, and the weight per horse-power developed, or its equivalent, are as in Table A.

Table A—Steam-driven Aeroplane Power-Plants

isr,s.

1S75. 1S'»1 . 1802. 1S'»4. 18%.

F.XPFRIMF.XTFR

. Stringfellow

.May........

. Ader ......

. Hargrave ..

.Maxim.....

. Lansrlev ____

. 13 lbs. per 1). p.

It may be well to note that the steam engine, even though a prime mover, is not an internal combustion engine. This type of apparatus necessitates the use of a boiler in which the fuel is burned and the steam generated. The steam is then conveyed to the engine proper and under the pressure exerted is caused to operate. The various machines above named proved quite successful, operating, however, for a very short

time only, as the stored supply of fuel and water was small of necessity, and therefore soon exhausted.

The results obtained by these experiments reinforced the view maintained by many that a practical machine which could develop continuous power and still be low in weight would be the only solution for the mechanical propulsion of aeroplanes. The internal combustion engine fulfilled these requirements but the weight was excessive. The ingenuity of engineers was then called upon, and soon the present day aero-motor was developed. In order to duly justify the various statements heretofore made regarding the weights of machinery, Table B is presented, giving average figures of modern or present day practice which may aid in their corroboration.

Table B—Weights of Modern Internal Combustion Engines

 

..........400 lbs. per h. p.

 

.......... 50

 

.......... 15

Aeroplane Engine............

.......... 4 " "

The values in Table B are not given as a means of discrediting the qualities and possibilities of the steam-engine for use in aeroplanes, for successful steam-driven automobiles do exist. The fact cannot be denied that this latter type of conveyance in actual practice has proved highly reliable, and can withstand extensive endurance; as regards weight, it may be safely said that it does not surmount the average found in gasoline vehicles by any great margin.

Other types of motive apparatus may and have been considered, but we will not attempt to go into these details, but proceed with the form of power-plant as found in modern aeroplanes, and to be considered in the next chapter.

WIRELESS CONTROLLED AIR TORPEDO

George F. Russell, of 120S Washington St., Hoboken, N. J., one of the old time Mineola flyers who has dropped out of ken for the past late years, has appeared over the horizon again, going strong.

He has evolved an aerial torpedo, gravity driven, capable of being steered more or less in the same directions as the power driven aeroplane.

The device consists of a supporting plane of about 16 sq. ft. in area, approximately 4 by 4 feet. This is mounted with three vertical struts of steel tubing, guyed, above two brass channels bolted back to back 7 ft. 2 ins. long, to which is attached a tapered aluminum tube with spun brass head and a tail outfit of the Curtiss order. The tube measures 12 ins. at the large end and 6 ins.

at the smaller end. The forward third is used for the containing of explosives with cap for ignition on contact.

At the time of launching from aircraft, a spring motor is set going which is used for operating the steering arrangement of the aluminum tail, which comprises a horizontal fin on each side of the tube, two elevators, a vertical fin and a vertical rudder. The control wires to the elevators and rudder are individual and either part may be operated alone through a system of wireless control of the spring motor.

In the rear end of the tube is a storage batter}- light, which would be visible to the crew handling the torpedos. A red or a green slide would move across the face of the lighted end, according lo which way the rudder turned, advis-

ing the aerial sharpshooters of the movements of the torpedo.

The whole outfit weighs, empty, in the neighborhood of fifty pounds, to which must be added explosive to the weight of 100 or 150 pounds.

The device, Mr. Russell explains, is really a monoplane glider, with large weight per area of supporting surface, traveling at high speed at a steep angle of incidence. He figures the angle of descent to be 1 in 3. The spring motor will run 10 minutes, plenty long enough to operate controls to the extent desired before the apparatus reaches the ground.

The torpedo is designed to be dropped from a dirigible, aeroplane or balloon. On a larger scale, the inventor claims a full-sized power driven man-less aero-Contimted on page ?S

SOME GENERAL OBSERVATIONS REGARDING AERIAL FOREST PATROL

Thousands of square miles in all the states are continually being patrolled for the detection and prevention of destructive forest fires. Great areas of cut lands are being reforested and the enemy is fire. Originally men were employed at stations to travel from one place to another on foot. Later, horses were used in the patrol work, and we now have steel towers with telephone lines running to headquarters or to the nursery where the men are at work. From the tower they get the alarm and the men in the nursery go and put the fire out.

State foresters are actively considering the aeroplane, both land and water, for aerial forest patrol. They consider it perfectly practical and that it will save an enormous amount of time of the men in the lookout towers and in patrolling the forests.

Mr. Auguston C. Carton, secretary Public Domain Commission of Michigan, has in mind a system of dropping fire extinguisher from the aeroplane when a fire first starts.

The matter of aerial patrol was taken up by State Forester W. T. Cox. of

Forest patrol can certainly be done thoroughly and economically by the use of flying boats and aeroplanes.

Flying boats should be used without question where there are lakes or rivers to furnish landing places, as they have several points of superiority over aeroplanes (land machines). The modern fh-ing boats are being operated practically without breakage of aii3' kind; and the danger of accidents from forced landings is eliminated ; while land machines are still subject to more or less breakage, depending on the skill of the pilot and *he physical characteristics of the country. The flying boat is also superior for the reason that the pilot and passengers sit in the bow of the boat and have an unobstructed view on all sides. This is a very important factor. Land machines can be btiilt with this arrangement and are being so constructed for use in the present war, but it is done at a considerable sacrifice of safety. In times of war the safety of the pilot is a secondary consideration.

Whether land or water machines are employed, a definite course will be charted for the ranger, having landing places, or stations, not more than five miles apart. By a station is meant a place where a safe landing can easily be made. In the case of the flying boat all that is required is water eight inches deep. For a land machine a fairly flat field 100 yards by 200 yards should be availahle. The machine must have a safe gliding angle of five to one. The aviator will then be safe with stations five miles apart if he maintains an altitude of 2,500 ft. In case of motor fail-

Minnesota, with the Navy, and negotiations were started with the Xaval Militia so that its services could be made use of at first, should the Militia be able to organize an aeronautic force.

In Wisconsin a trial has already been made. L. A. Vilas is spending the summer at Trout Lake, which is in the heart of the Wisconsin state forest reserve, and he has taken a great deal of interest in the work of the forest rangers in locating forest fires from the steel lookout towers, which are built on high points, and which are connected with the headquarters camp and ranger stations by telephone. It immediately occurred to Mr. Vilas that during a dangerously dry season, he could easily detect any forest fires which might start up, and he did locate and report a fire which was some fortv miles awav.

Mr. E. "M. Griffith,' State Forester, says: "On the evening of June 22 he took me up in his flying boat, as he wanted me to see another fire which he had just noticed while flying over to our camp. Wc went to a height of 1,600 feet, and from that elevation I estimate that we could see some 200,000 acres of

By Roger W. Jannus.

ure lie can easily reach the nearest station without power.

Some aviators take chances on their motors. They fly into places from which they could not possibly make a safe landing if the motor were to stop from any one of the thousand causes that may develop at any time. That kind of flying is a matter of luck, pure and simple. The writer does not believe in such a lack of policy, as it is certain to result in accident sooner or later. When we have larger machines with several motors, of which at least one can be out of commission, then we can safely have the stations at considerable distance apart without undue hazard.

The machine should have a minimum speed not greater than SO miles per hour, and a maximum of about 65 miles per hour; and should be relatively large and stable. The larger the machine the better, up to about 1,800 pounds in the case of the boat and 1,600 for the aeroplane, because a large machine properly built is infinitely more stable than a small one, and is capable of going up in strong winds with ease. While it is possible to fly a small, high-powered machine in any wind that can blow, with the exception of a tornado, it often gets to be nerve-racking and fatiguing physically if the flight is over five or ten minutes' duration.

Flying boats suitable for this purpose can be built, with a fair profit, for from $6,000 to $8,000. The initial cost of aeroplanes is slightly less, but when the greater risk and the possibility of having to prepare landing places is considered, the boat is the cheaper proposi-

forest reserve lands. Very easily and quickly we located the small fire, which we found was caused by a settler burning brush, and which was doing no damage. This fire could have been located from an elevation of not more than 500 feet, bnt we went to a higher elevation in order to make sure that there were no other fires within a radius of 25 or 30 miles.

"I consider that the use of the aeroplane in locating fires is perfectly practical, and that it will save an enormous amount of time of the men in the lookout towers, and also in patrolling the forests. Of course, the first cost of a machine will be considerable, but it would be saved within a couple of years by the patrol work which it would take the place of."

Through Aeronautics, manufacturers have been asked to submit data on upkeep, best type of machine, both land and water; first cost, operation, and so forth. All State foresters are being given by Aeronautics the fullest information on the application of the aeroplane to this new field.

tion of the two in most cases. Upkeep is difficult to estimate, but should not be over $50 a month for gasoline, oil and small repairs. $50 per week should attract aviators of sufficient ability, and a good mechanic will cost about $20 per week. This brings the running expense to $350 per month.

In order that practically all the patrolling could be done from the air, machines should be ordered at least 50 per cent, in excess of the number required for normal service. As is the case with any machinery, a portion of the equipment will be undergoing repairs and overhauling all the time. Provision for this should be made by obtaining a number of machines of exactly the same model so that parts would be interchangeable. There will be no accomplishment and no satisfaction if the thing is gone tit without sufficient funds and equipment. The scheme itself would then be blamed when failure would really be due only to the lack of sufficient financial resources.

In the event of our being involved in war these machines and men would be of inestimable value, as neither machines nor aviators in large quantities can be obtained on short notice. It is simply an impossibility, as both are the result of long and expensive development.

It is to be sincerely hoped that the adoption of aircraft by the Forest Reservations will be one of the first steps in the general aerial awakening which is now taking place in our country.

NAVY'S FLOATING DIRIGIBLE SHED

Contract has been awarded the Amer-can Bridge Company for building a floating dirigible shed at Pensacola, Fla., to be finished within eight months. This will house the dirigible now being built by Captain Baldwin.

It will consist of a steel pontoon carrying a steel frame structure, with sides and roof of corrugated galvanized sheet steel. The pontoon is 225 ft. long, 65 ft. 6 ins. beam, 6 ft. in depth. The shed

The shed is designed to stand a wind pressnre of 12 pounds to the square foot on the sides and 30 pounds on the closed end. The windows and other details will be noted on the drawings.

A gasoline engine is provided for, near the closed end of the shed, with capstan both outside and inside the shed, operating either independently or in conjunction. An inclosure at the forward end of the shed is to be fitted up for a

NAVY WILL HAVE HYDROGEN AND OXYGEN PLANT AT PENSACOLA

Contract has been awarded the International Oxygen Co. for the furnishing to the Xavy Aeronautic Station at Pensacola, Fla., of a oxygen and hydrogen gas producing plant, complete with generating units, pnmps, compressors for hydrogen and oxygen, purifier, pressure regulators, distilling stoves, coolers, scrubbers, switchboards, motor trans-

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itself is 187 ft. 6 ins., height 62 ft. and 56 ft. 6 ins. wide. This will comfortably house a dirigible 35 feet in diameter.

Along each side there will be a wooden balcony at a height about that of the longitudinal centre of the airship. Two overhead trolleys, suitable for carrying 2,000 pounds at anv point, are provided for.

As the outfit will not be docked for very long periods, great care is to be taken with the tinder-water plating of the pontoon, and the bottom and sides will be coated with bituminous compositions and an enamel which alone will be at least 3/16 inch thick. The sides of the pontoon above the lower guard and the outside of the shed will be painted a slate color. The entire inside of the pontoon will be painted with a bituminous solution and a bituminous cement or enamel. The inside of the shed, including the steel framework but excluding the inside of the galvanized corrugated sheet steel, will be finished in plain white.

The pontoon is divided into eight water-tight compartments by one center line longitudinal and three transverse bulkheads. '

watchman, with necessary berthing and other accommodations.

At the open end of the shed there is provided a canvas curtain, made in two halves with lap at the center and means for lacing together. Rings and pipe are provided above the top edge of the curtain so that each half can be hauled over to the side and then brailed in clear of arches

The curtain is variously supported with rope and blocks and falls are provided for closing, opening and handling the curtain. Three main verical stays of 5s-inch rope fastened at the top to the arch and at the bottom to the deck of the pontoon, and means for taking up slack, are provided. For the purpose of preventing the bellying of the curtain the center mainstay is fastened to the deck so that after the halves of the curtain have been laced together the center stay will form a ridge rope. Side stays are suitably located to support the curtain in this position.

The car of the airship is to be hauled in over the deck of the pontoon on a car provided for this purpose. A track to accommodate this car is to he fitted on the deck of the pontoon in the center of the shed.

formers, ventilating fans and all other uecessar.v machinery; instruments, gauges, meters, thermometers, etc.; gasometers for holding one day's output of hydrogen; SO hydrogen flasks to hold 200 cubic feet of hydrogen each under 1.800 pounds pressure; 6 oxygen flasks to hold 200 feet of oxygen under like pressure.

The plant must produce 15,000 cubic feet of hydrogen per day of 99.5^ purity and be capable of enlargement by the addition of similar units. It should be designed so that it can be easily taken down, transported and erected on freight cars, lighters or ships, either complete or in smaller units; to be capa> ble of being frequently stopped and started with little loss of time or efficiency; to be capable of laying idle without deterioration. The Navy Department supplies the electric power and the contractor all other material.

De Lloyd Thompson flew over the Continental Divide, at Butte, Montana, on July 16th. The exact height of the divide is not known, but the city is about 5,600 feet altitude. The Gyro motor worked perfectly and had plenty of reserve at highest altitude. He looped twelve times, tlevv upside down and negotiated the tumble with perfect ease at that altitude.

NAVY WANTS MOTORS—NO COMPETITION.

It is probable that a proposal will be sent out shortly inviting bids for several motors for aeronautical work in the Navy. The Navy Department has not proposed any motor competition,

such as the newspapers are mentioning with the usual accuracy.

Two aeroplanes have been recently ordered from Thomas Brothers & Co. without bid, and the Burgess contract has also been previously announced in Aeronautics. The Wright machine recently delivered at Pensacola was ordered a year ago last February.

1 beg to advise you that the advertisement (one insertion) inserted in your magazine has brought in about 10 to 12 replies; and in that lot were two parties with just what was needed. —An Advertiser.

NEW COMPANIES

Sturtevant Aeroplane Co., Jamaica Plain, Mass. Grover Cleveland Loening resigned his position as aeronautical engineer with the Signal Corps on July 15th and is now connected with this new company.

Thomas Aeromotor Co., Ithaca, XT. Y.

PLENTY OF AIR SPECIALISTS

Two more air advisers have been appointed by Secretary Daniels to act on the Naval Advisory Board, in addition to Messrs. M. B. Sellers. Technical Editor of Aernautics, and Hudson Maxim, named hy The Aeronautical Society of America, on July 27th at the request of Secretary Daniels made on July 19th.

Now, Henry A. Wood, "president" of "The American Society of Aeronautical Engineers," and Elmer A. Sperry, also a member, as well as a member of The Aeronautical Society of America, have been named by the above new organization, which latter Thomas A. Edison states has been formed at his request. Mr. Edison is chairman of the Naval Advisory Board.

A few days after The Aeronautical Societj- was asked, on July 19th, to select two of its members to serve on the Naval Advisory Board a letter was hurriedly sent out on letterheads of "The American Society of Aeronautic Engineers," 297 Madison Avenue.

These letters advised the recipients that they "have been selected to become one of the members of the American Society of Aeronautic Engineers. . . ."

On July 23rd over a hundred names were published in the daily papers as "members" of this organization "composed entirely of aeronautic engineers and experts to co-operate with the New Advisory Committee of the Navy," evidently meaning the Naval Advisory Board. On August 9th a contemporary prints a request from Secretary Daniels to the new organization, the wording being the same as the request to The Aeronautical Society, to select two of its members to serve, and commenting on "the work your society has done,"—this organization of a few days of age.

Better second fiddle than no fiddle at all!

AIRCRAFT IN THE PRESENT WAR

It is expected that by the next issue we will have received the arranged-for article on Aircraft in the War, by ex-Lieutenant Riley E. Scott, illustrated with exclusive pictures taken on the German side. This will be entirely un-expurgated.

TEXAS AERO SHEDS FOR SIGNAL CORPS

The plans and specifications for the aeroplane sheds to be erected at the Army Post at Fort Sam Houston, near San Antonio. Tex., to house the aero-plans of the proposed aviation school which were opened at the national capital in the office of the chief signal officer, on June 20, are novel in the door

The doors are composed of Js-inch tongue and groove sheathing laid diagonally over a regulation door frame. An astragal moulding is secured to the side of each door to make a tight joint. In the floor an inverted T shape of structural steel imbedded in concrete engages a groove plate on the hottom of the

The first of July saw as many machines on hand at San Diego as can be used for some time to come. The First Aero Squadron has its new equipment, and the School is amply supplied with training machines.

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Front ElevaT/on

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$7,000,000 is easily the contracted aeronautical engine output for F'15, judging from orders now in hands and parts farmed out. All these makers advertise in Aekoxautics.

Another story which has not been denied—neither has it been affirmed—is to the effect that a certain well-known author and accredited authority is to head a large company in the manufacture of aircraft, with offices in the Hub.

arrangements. The two sheds each will house five planes and will cost in the neighborhood of $20,000. Corrugated iron will be used in the construction.

As is to be expected on Government work, the construction of the hangers, though very simple, is yet of the best throughout. The framework is of structural steel, which in turn is covered with corrugated steel No. 26 gauge, with corrugations 2l/2 x >s inches.

The most interesting feature lies in the manner of disposing of the doors when the shed is open. On either side of the partition between adjacent hangers there is fixed a swinging door of the same general construction as the sliding doors except that the upper panels are glazed. An overhead track runs across the front of the shed, curves behind the swinging doors, and then runs along the sides of the shed. Two heavy, ballbearing, pivoted door hangers on each door, run on this track and thereby can be slid from the closed position in front to the open position along the sides, rounding the curve behind the swinging end doors.

doors and holds them in alignment. The illustrations give an idea of the construction.

The construction at San Antonio will unfortunately not be completed until about the middle of December, when the

"There's no business to he had, why advertise?"—Manufacturer in 1912.

"We've got more than we can handle now, why advertise?"—Same, 1915.

A vision was observed the other day of a two by four slice of wood, emitting

Section under roof

First Aero Squadron will go there for station, and San Antonio will then be a focus of aeronautical activity, but until December there will be nothing doing except construction work on buildings.

dense smoke and harking like twin gat-ling guns after a night out, travelling at 60 or more miles an hour over Mar-blehead harbor. Looking for stray comets, an observer at Blue Hill descried through his -42-centimetre telescope a crouching form clinging to a wreath of smoke and endeavoring to guide the wild course of the thing by means of a piece of tin nailed to the end of a stick. On the next round it was seen to he W. "Startling" (see esteemed contemporary for spelling) Burgess, and it was later learned said Burgess was merely testing the new twin eight motor. This was later confirmed by Frank Russell. Publicity Engineer.

BURGESS HAS N. Y. OFFICE

The Burgess Company has established a New York office at 331 Madison Avenue, in charge of Aviator Frank Cofifyn.

Aeronautics is and always has been the best magazine for the technical reader, and 1 have sent many an inquiry your way when they wanted to subscribe "for a good aero magazine.—Advertiser.

K-W SPECIAL AEROPLANE MODEL MAGNETO.

This illustration shows the Model II K-W High Tension Magneto, made especially for aeroplane motors, and the makers claim it is the only Magneto made that will run an 8-cylinder motor at crank shaft speed.

The reason therefor is explained by reference to illustration of winding shown herewith, in which you will note that the winding, which is concentric with the armature, is mounted between the two halves of the rotor and stands absolutely still.

These rotors collect the magnetism from one pole piece and conduct it

EXPORTS AND IMPORTS.

IMPORTS

May, 1915 ..................... none

Same period, 1914, 1 aeroplane

($1,S56) ; parts ($3,920) ;

total ........................$ 5,776

11 months ending May, 1915,

parts only ................... 2,371

Same period, 1914, 1 aeroplane

($1,856) ; parts ($30,279) ;

total ........................ 32,135

through the center of the winding to the opposite pole piece, thus giving a powerful wave of current from a quarter revolution of the Magneto. Therefore, by the use of a 4-point cam, four sparks per revolution of the Magneto can be obtained, and the Magneto, running at crank shaft speed, will lire an 8-cylinder, 4-cycle engine. Of course, on 2-cycle engines the speed would have to be doubled.

The regular Magneto, using hard red brass castings, weighs 26 pounds, but where it is desirable to dispense with every ounce of weight possible, theMag-neto can be made 1 inch shorter and aluminum castings used, instead of hard red brass, and the weight brought down to 22 pounds.

This is the same type Magneto now being successfully used on a large number of traction engines put out in this country. Several large orders have been filled for British war trucks. This type of Magneto is used as standard equipment by several large stationary and traction engine builders. No engine has yet been found too large or that runs too slow for same. Similarly, no engine has yet been found too high speed, as the circuit breaker is quick acting.

The stationary circular winding is capable of insulation to a far higher degree than any type of rotating winding, thus rendering the Magneto extremely reliable and eliminating all danger of puncture at high speeds. The circular winding delivers a pure dynamic spark of high heat, thus exploding the mixture much more rapidly and with a great deal more power, as well as preventing the engine from carbonizing and fouling its spark plugs.

Full description and prices will he furnished on application to the makers, The K-W Ignition Company, 2870 Chester Ave., N. E., Cleveland, Ohio.

Same period, 1913, 13 aeroplanes ($50,920); parts ($1,776); total .......................... 52,696

DOMESTIC EXPORTS

Mav, 1915, 10 aeroplanes ($83,950); parts ($160,412); total. 244,362

Same period, 1914, 1 aeroplane

($4,000) ; parts ($558) ; total. 4,558

11 months ending May, 1915, 90 aeroplanes ($674,807), parts ($444,328) ; total ...........1,119,135

Same period, 1914, 30 aeroplanes ($164,424); parts ($37,135); total ........................ 198,559

Same period, 1913, 26 aeroplanes ($75,950) ; parts ($23,776); total ........................ 99,726

EXPORTS OF FOREIGN

May, 1915 ..................... none

11 months ending May, 1915.... none Same period, 1914, 1 aeroplane

($4,049) ; parts ($900)....... 4,949

IN WAREMOUSE MAY 31

1915, 1 aeroplane...............$ 1,856

1914, 1 aeroplane ($1,856) ; parts

($3,420) ; total .............. 5,276

THE GIBSON PROPELLER PATENT.

A patent issued to Hugo C. Gibson, who formerly conducted a propeller business, on July 20, 1915 (application filed June 4, 1910), No. 1,147,233, has a distinct bearing on the propeller-making industry, as it is claimed that this patent is basic and is particularly strong on account of the early date of application and the fact that priority had to be proved over foreign manufacturers.

Figure 1 is a plan view of a propeller made according to this invention. Fig. 2 is a plan view of the same in one of

the steps of manufacture. Fig. 3 is a sectional end elevation. Fig. 4 is a plan view of a modified form, and Fig. 5 illustrates the textile band.

According to the invention each of the parts which is to be one of the layers is first sawed out according to patterns of predetermined shape which leaves them with flat parallel sides and with edges at right angles thereto. Then these pieces are glued together with the portions thereof which are to form the hub in axial alignment with each other and with their parts overlapping one another with predetermined amounts. (See Fig. 2 and 3.) The shapes of the patterns and amounts of overlap are figured and plotted and transferred to wood or other material of which the propeller is to be made. The shapes are such as to cause the lines of intersection between adjacent layers to be the desired lines of the finished propeller taken at different horizontal sections.

The process is a familiar one to all propeller makers and need not be gone into at more length.

The claims have been abstracted following, with qualifying and amplifying phrases included; individual claims, of which there are 8, may be read with and without these:

The method consists in cutting a plurality of strips (of wood, with their grain longitudinally disposed; or different

1,147,233.

PntenWJuiy 211.1915.

WITNESSES

ATTORNEY

kinds of wood; or other material) to desired shapes, fastening said strips together in such predetermined relations that the lines joining the intersections of said strips, in any plane cutting said strips at right angles, are either one or both curved lines, and cutting away those portions of the strip which project beyond their lines of intersection; covering parts of said propeller with an endless band of stretchable or other textile material.

High Tension Magneto

Model H

Especially adapted for Aeronautical work. The only Magneto thai will Are an ~" speed. Requires no Coil or Battery. (.lives maximum, speed and power.

Under engine at crank shaft

Semi for Catalogue Eighteen

IGNITIOn C?)

CtmiijiD.Oiuo. USA

PATENTS

Manufacturers want me to send them patents on useful inventions. Send me at once drawing and description of your invention and I will give you an honest report as to securing a patent and whether 1 can assist you in selling the patent. Highest references. Established 25 vears. Personal attention in all cases.

WM. N. MOORE Loan and Trust Building Washington, D. C.

PATENTS

THAT PROTECT AND PAY

Books and Advice Free

Send sketch or model for search. Highest references. Best Results. Promptness Assured.

WATSON E. COLEMAN, Patent Lawyer

624 F Street, N. W. Washington, D. C.

BALDWIN

sm Balloons H Dirigibles Fabrics Motors

Box 78, Madison Sq. P.O.. New York

DflN'T w"te °* unka U\Jl* 1 yoll aIe jn,er.

ested in a reliable, efficient

aadeconomical power plant.

That is the only kind we

build. Four sizes.

Reasonable Prices

Kemp Machine Works Muncie, Inc.

AERONAUTICS

E The Leading British Weekly = E Journal Devoted to theTechnique E = and Industry of Aeronautics E

(POUNDED 1907) =

E Yearly Subscription: S

~ Two Dollars Ten Cents. Post Free ~

— (Money Orders Only) —

■ Head Offizm: ■

E 170 Fleet Street - - London, E. C = = Ameriua Office: 250 Wesl 54lh Slreel, New York =

niiiiiiiillliiiiiimilliiiiiinilil......Him.....11111 iT=

OF AN ESPECIALLY HIGH GRADE and HIGH STRENGTH

for AVIATORS

JOHN A. ROEBLING'S SONS CO.

TRENTON. N. J.

Charavay Propellers

For Efficiency

THE AIRCRAFT CO., Inc. 1733 Broadway, New York

Sole Manufacturers of Sloane Aeroplanes

PATFNT^ Frederick W.Barker

Jl 1 JLJll 1 \J Attorney and Expert in

PATENTS, TRADE MARKS AND DESIGNS

due's prepared and prosecuted I 28 Years in Praclice with the greatest care and

thoroughness, to ensure broad Direct CnurjeclioDs io all

scope and validity Foreign Cnnatries

P. O. Box 139, Times Square Station, New York City

BALLOONS DIRIGIBLES

Records prove we build the best Balloons in America. Nine 1st prizes. Three 2nd. and Two 3rd prizes out of fourteen World-wide Contests.

Write for prices and particulars.

HONEYWELL BALLOON CO. 3233 Benton Blvd. Kansas City, MD

r--< BENOIST «s—

" Aeroplanes and Flying Boats

BENOIST AEROPLANE CO., Inc. Factory and Office

341 S. St. Louis Avenue

CHICAGO, III.

BALLOONS

Airships, Aeroplanes, Gas Generators, Safety Packs, Parachutes. Exhibitions furnished with Balloons, Aeroplanes and Airships. Stevens' Balloons used by 95=6 of American and Canadian Clubs. MADISON SQUARE, BOX 181, NEW YORK

Aeronaut LEO STEVENS

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CHARACTERISTICS OF AMERICAN MOTORS (Aug. 1, 1915)

NAME

Rated No. Bore HP Cyl.

Stroke

Kemp ........

Maximotor.. Maximotor. . . . Maximotor. . Maximotor. . Maximotor . . Maximotor. .

tRoberts.........

tRoberts. . . . ■ , tRoberts..........

Rausenberger.

Robinson Kadial.

Selvage......

Sterling Flyer... Sturtevant ....

Sturtevant.....

Sturtevant......

Sturtevant ....

JThomas........

Trebert ........

\'an Bierck. . . .

Welles-Adams . .

Wright.........

Wright.........

Wright.........

so

8

4 25

40

4

4 5

no

4

5.

70

6

4 .5

90

6

5

120

S

4 5

150

s

5

05

4

5

100

r,

5.

200

0

0 5

150

12

4 125

100

(5

5.

70

8

,3.75

130

0

'5.5

100

4

4.5

so

6

4 5

140

S

4 .

50

4

4.5

150

8

X.B.

150

0

5 .5

3(1

4

4 375

lit)

6

4 375

Stated RPM

4 75 1 1200

5.5 5. 5 5

5.E

5. 5. 6 6. 6.

4 . 0.'

X.B.

Slated Lbs.

with All Arcessories but without Water.! Gas or Oil

1250

1250

1250 1

1250

1250

1250

1500 | 1500 1500 1200 I 1350 |

2000 1250 000

14-1500 1200

14-1500

2200

1500

1400

385

275 325 375 400 425 500 ■

250 340 080 590 300

250 N.B. 400 325 550 230

520 Nol

710-a

Not

 

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Wt.

 

A.L.

P

or

A.M.

Rated

B

Formula

III'

   

(Lbs.)

1.11

57 9

5

 

1 11

32.4

0.

87

1 10

40.0

5

41

1 . 11

4S. fi

5

35

(J.

00.

4

44

1 11

04 8

3

54

1 . 10

SO

3

33

0

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0.

99.

3

50

0 92

107 3

3

40

1 .45

SI .6

3

113

1 20

GO.

3

 

1 .00

45

3

57 ■

N.B.

N.B.

N

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1 33

32 4

1

 

1 .00

4S 0

4

 

1 .3S

51 2

3

9

1 .00

32 4

1

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N.B.

3

40

1 09

given 190 1 9 305 1 02

Not yet rea dy

30 0 40 0

0 53 5 07

Caol ing

W W W W

w w

w w w w

A

W W W W

w w

w w

Lbs. Stated Water BUB

-10 00 70 90 100 125

N.B. N.B. N.B. 42

50 N.B.

N.B. N B

N.B. N.B.

Lbs. Per BHP

o

Arrangement of Cylinders

S2

4

70

Vee

29

ti

87

Vert.

38

5

41

Vert.

42

5

35

Vert.

40

4

44

Vert.

50

3

54

Vee

03

3

33

Vee

N.B.

N

B.

Vert.

N.B.

N

1!

Vert.

N.B.

N

B.

Vert.

N.B

N

IS.

Vee

N.B.

N

B

Radial

70

3

57

N.B.

130

N.B.

Vert.

105

3

9

Vert.

83

3

9

V ert.

142

3

9

Vee

52

4

43

Vert.

150

3

34

Vee

150

•1

73

Vert.

N.B. N.B.

N.B. I Vert. N.B Vert.

O z > c

H

O

in

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> m X m m H

Z

p

WIRELESS CONTROLLED AIR TORPEDO

Continued front page 21 plane, with a compressed air automatic stability device, loaded to capacity with explosives, could, by his device, be guided in its course of destruction from other aircraft, for instance, keeping the aeroplane in sight front a height above the range of anti-aircraft guns.

Russell taught himself to fly in one of the very earliest Curtiss machines. Had he taken his pilot's certificate it would have been numbered in the first dozen issued, along with Capt. Baldwin, Tod Shriver, Charlie Willard, "Bud" Mars and Charles K. Hamilton.

THOMAS AEROMOTOR CO. ORGANIZED.

To till the unprecedented demand for reliable, high powered aeronautical motors required by our own government and foreign nations, \Y. T. Thomas, of the Thomas Bros. Aeroplane Co., Ithaca, N. Y., has organized the Thomas Aeromotor Co.. papers for which have been filed at Albany. The incorporators are: YV. T. Thomas and E. B. Cress-well, of Ithaca, N. Y.; Harold N. Bliss, George H. Abel and Raymond Ware, of Boston, Mass.

Harold X. Bliss and George H. Abel were, until recently, in the designing work and production of the Sturtevant M fg. Co., Mr. Bliss acting as Chief Engineer. The new Thomas motor com-

pany starts out with every qualification for producing a motor which should prove capable of meeting the increasingly severe conditions of service under which present day aeronautical motors must work.

The construction of the first lot of these motors is well under way, and plans are completed for the productions in large quantities. There are incorporated in this new design many original ideas calculated to give an all-round efficiency claimed to be heretofore uu-attained in this country. The general layout calls for a compact, lightweight "Y" type motor of 150 to 180 H. P. operating at speeds of 2,000 to 2,500 R. P. M., any desired propeller speed being obtained by gear reduction. These high speeds have been made possible by the employment of large valves, exceptionally light pistons of a special alloy, and connecting rods machined all over from forgings having an elastic limit of 280,000 lbs.

Due to Mr. Thomas' connection with the new company, this motor has been designed to meet the particular requirements of the Thomas military tractors, which have proven so satisfactory both here and abroad. However, the designers have not lost sight of its equal adaptability to the pusher type. Provision has been made to take care of counterclockwise driven crankshaft, to provide for installation in twin tractors or pushers of the latest type war planes in use abroad.

The Thomas motor is equipped to meet all military requirements with the latest accessories such as self-starter, wireless drive, tachometer, etc. The first lot of motors will be coming through about September 1st.

AERO MART.

FOR SALE—50 H. P. Gnome, good as new; 9 pistons for a 60 H. P. Curtiss standard; 48 rings for same; 3 wheels 20 by 2V2. John Weaver, Box 7, Oklahoma City, Okla.

NOTICE

I would like to correspond with party who, for an interest therein, would furnish capital necessary for obtaining patents and marketing an improved form of aeroplane, embodying higher efficiency, stability and instantaneous respond to control. "Not a freak hut a tested design." Address R. J. D., care Aeronautics.

Imagine six wheelbarrow loads of castings for push rod bearings, of which eight are used to one engine, in one parts factory working on aeronautical war sub-orders from one motor firm! Trips through machine plants working on this engine reminds one of sectionls of the "famous Flivver factory.

.jgfe THE COAST LINE TO ^a.

£macki n ac^

DETROIT, ' -1 j " TOLEDO, CLEVELAND, BUFFALO, JPT. HURON, ALPENA, •NIAGARA FALLS.- 1 ST. IGNACE.

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NAIAD

*

Aeronautical Cloth

+

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AND

Aero Varnish

Wc were the first in the field, and the test of time is proving that our product is the best.

+ +

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•fr Samole Book A-6, Dala and Prices on Reqnesl X

I The C. E. Conover Co.

J MANUFACTURERS

% 101 Franklin Street, New York |

^ A LAKE TRIP FOR REST AND RECREATION^

Have a real vacation on the Great Lakes, the moat en-iovable and economical outing in America. The cool 1 ike breezes, the ever-changing scenes along the shore, and the luxurious steamers of the D. 6r C. Line are positive guarantees th^tt you will enjoy every minute of your trip, and return home refreshed and glad you went. Daily service between Detroit and Cleveland and Detroit and Buffalo. Four trips weekly from Toledo and Detroit to Mackinac Island and way ports. Two trips weekly, special steamer, Cleveland to Mackinac Island, no stops cnroute except Detroit and Alpena, Special day trips between Detroit and Cleveland during July and August. Daily service between Toledo and Put-In-Bay.

RAILROAD TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR TRANS POR r ATI ON on D. & C. Steamers between Detroit and Buffalo or Detroit and Cleveland either direction. Send two-cent stamp for illustrated pamphlet and Great Lakes map. Address L. G- Lewis, G.P.A.. Detroit. Mich.

Detroit & Cleveland Navigation Company Philip H. McMillan, Pres., A. A. Schantz. V. P. & G. M. AH Steamers arrive »nd depart, Third Ave. wharf, Det.

ROBERTS

You Couldn't Expect More Value

100 H.P. 200 H.P.

A

340 lbs. 690 lbs.

You Couldn't Get More Satisfaction

$1,250 $1,850

Q-D" Motor — Simple No Vibration —10-Hour Test for Motor Guaranteed to Stand More Abuse and Heavy with Less Attention than Any Other Motor. IT WANTS IS GASOLINE AND SPARK

'v'liftrailar ROBERTS MOTOR MANUFACTURING COMPANY 30O Roberts Motor Block ' SANDUSKY, OHIO, U. S. A.

MOTORS

'More maryl^

OF AMERICA 2» West 39th Slreet, New Yorta

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

SELLERS AND MAXIM FOR ADVISORY BOARD

On July 27th a special meeting of the Board of Directors was held at the rooms of the Society, to take action upon the invitation received from the Honorahle Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy, that the Society select two of its members as the representatives of the Aeronautical Society of America in the Advisory Committee for the Navy. A large and enthusiastic gathering answered the call, comprising: Frederick W. Barker, Acting President, in the chair, and the following directors : Rudolph R. Grant. Charles W. Howell, Earle Atkinson, Merrill E. Clark, Capt. Thomas S. Baldwin, Rudolph Hanau, Ernest D. Anderson, Edward Durant, Oscar Hermanson, Walter V. Kamp, Leo Stevens, William J. Hammer, Ernest L. Jones, Leon Goldmerstein, Frank O. Burridge, Matthew B. Sellers. Thos.

A. Hill, E. P. Hopkins and Walter L. Post.

A poll having been taken by mail of tlie members, careful consideration was given the candidates of the ballot, and, acting thereon, a number of nominations were made, the qualifications of each nominee fully and freely discussed, and after a vote was taken, the following gentlemen were selected as the Society's representatives: Hudson Maxim, Past President of the Society; Matthew

B. Sellers, Director and Member of the Technical Board.

Most earnest and thoughtful consideration was given the subject by each member of the Board, all agreeing the question to be momentous, and constituting one of the most important events in the history of the Society, because by this means the Society would be enabled to prove of direct service to the Lnited States Government in the important branch of aeronautical machines and appliances and the arts and sciences relating thereto. Hence the choice of the right men was imperative, and the Society believes that in selecting Messrs. Maxim and Sellers it could have done no better. The Directors declared the Society a unit in its determination to support its representatives to the utmost of its power and ability, so that the Navy Department will have the benefit of all the best data and earnest effort which the Society, through its technical Board, Aeronautical Engineers' Society, and individual members, are able to supply, in the cause of the advancement of aviation for the service of the nation.

Announcement is made that the paper by Charles R. Wittemann, entitled "Theory and Experiments in Following Plane Machines," which has been discussed by the Technical Board, and reviewed by the Aeronautical'Engineers' Society, is now in the press, and copies thereof will within a few days be mailed to all members.

This paper is being published under the Lee S. Burridge Foundation. Other papers are now in course of preparation, and members generally are invited to communicate with Rudolph R. Grant. Chairman of the Technical Hoard, regarding subjects upon which they intend to prepare papers for similar treatment.

The following new members have been elected: Harry L. Barnitz, Montague Palmer, Paul Brockett, Thomas F. Flinn,

Meetings are held every Tuesday evening, at 8.15.

WICHITA AERO CLUB FORMED

An aero club has been organized by Wichita men at a meeting addressed by Capt. H. E. Honeywell, the balloon builder of Kansas City. Great enthusiasm was aroused and a sub:>cription was started for the purchase of a spherical to be finished for the fall race scheduled to start from Wichita on October 4th. Captain Honeywell will train one or more members so the balloon can be piloted by a native Wichitan.

The picture herewith was taken from the captive balloon being operated by Capt. Honeywell at Electric Park, Kansas City, at an altitude of 1,000 feet. Great success is being attained, and eight or nine passengers in addition to

tion contest for the purpose of selecting the members to represent the club in the first national contest for distance for hand launched models took place August 1st at Hempstead Plains.

A great deal of interest has arisen in compressed air motors. Messrs. McMa-han and Schober have both built models equipped with compressed air motors. Schober claims a flight of over 20 seconds and McMahan 17 seconds. At the first national contest on August 22nd at Hempstead McMahan and Schober will compete against one another.

U. S. PATENTS ISSUED.

JULY 13TH.

Aeroplane. H. B. Chalmers. No. 1,1-45,972.

Aeroplane. R. D. Andrews. No. 1,145,060.

Bombs from flying-machines to other objects, means for attaching. F. A. Du-gro. No. 1.146.695.

Aeroplane. H. B. Chalmers. No. 1,145,973.

JULY 20.

Aerial Vehicle. A. Beurrier and J. A. Bigonrdan. No. 1.147,294.

Airship. J. W. Broderick. No. 1,146,842.

JULY 27.

Propeller, system of manufacture. A. H. C. Gibson. No. 1.147,233.

Hvdroaeroplane. T. Sloper. No. 1,148,340.

Aeroplane stabilizing device. T. M. Reynolds. No. 1.14S.050.

Airships, equalizing drive mechanism for. H. W. Atwood and D. D. Stern-bergh. No. 1.14S.2S0.

the pilot are being carried each trip; this in spite of inclement weather. The bag is of 33,000 cubic foot size and is inflated with hydrogen gas.

MODEL NEWS.

All the members of the Aero Science Club of America are preparing for the coming national contests. The elimina-

MORRISS FLYING TO NEW YORK.

Percy G. B. Morriss left Chicago on August 3rd with a message to Aeronautics in New York. He will travel in his Benoist fixing boat via the Great Lakes. Details of his trip will be furnished to Aeronautics.

KAMP

32S E. 23Slh Street. JVeir Vork

WALTER V. KAMP, maker

Laminated woodwork of any shaue, strongest — lightest and best construction for any kind of Aircraft

AERONAUTICAL RADIATORS

Rome Radiators are Used on the Highest Grade Aeroplanes

\Vritcfor ROME-TURNEY RADIATOR CO., Rome, N.Y., U. S. A.

Particular*_ _*_*_

Overman Cushion Tread Pneumatic Tires

manufactured by

LOUIS R. ADAMS & CO., Inc. 250 W. 54th St.,New York CO., 527 West 56th Street, New York

A-Z

RADIATORS. SEATS, TANKS, REPAIRS, SPECIALISTS IN METAL WORKING

HEATH AERONAUTICAL MOTORS

AIR AND WATER COOLED 5-to-S00 H. P. Catalogue 4 red stamps

E. B. HEATH AERIAL VEHICLE CO. CHICAGO

JANNUS BROTHERS FLYING SCHOOL

Complete Course $300.00 Address: Toledo. Ohio ... General Delivery

Prompt Shi

AERO WHEEL CO,

Room 4S0

SIZES pmcnt QuaoJity Orders

1777 Broadway, New York

Spare Parts for Aeroplanes

GNOME AND ANZANI MOTORS NEW YORK CITY

KLUTSKENS & PELOGGIO 112 West 42nd Street

A. D.WITTEMANN

specialist in steel and woodwork. k. d. aeroplanes. motors cher-hauled. experimental aeroplanes built and demonstrated. ability and standing certified by "aeronautics." 17 Ocean Terrace and Little Clove Road Stapleton, S, I.. n. Y.

BOOKS

L

^1

Send for new and complete catalogue

AERONAUTICS, 250 W«t 54th Street, NEW YORK

JUST OUT-

WE ARE HEADQUARTERS

for model aeroplanes, accessories and supplies Very complete catalog free on request

Wading River Mfg. Co.

Wading RlTer, N. Y.

MODELS

The American Aviation Directory

will contain ALL information about American flying. If you own, fly, make or sell anything connected with aeronautics, send in your name for classification in the September issue. XO CHARGE, OF COURSE

509 Merchanls-Laclede Bldg.

St. Louis, Mo.

Military Machines Delivered "Quick"

Thomas Military Tractor Biplanes—any quantity—manufactured and delivered at short notice. Ten specializing departments, with production at fingertips can double or treble output immediately. Thomas representatives in Europe constantly in direct touch with European development.

Most advanced design. Strong, serviceable, no tinkering. Ordered and re-ordered by mighty governments. Surpassed U. S. Army requirements.

Thomas Bros. Aeroplane Co., Ithaca, N. Y.

Military Tractors Flying Boats Aeroplanes

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The

Wright

Company

(The

Wrisht

Patents)

THE NEW WRIGHT AEROPLANES

For sport, exhibition or military use, over land or water now embody the improvements that have been suggested by the experiments quietly conducted during the past ten years.

THE WRIGHT FLYING SCHOOL

Located at Dayton opens May 1st, for the season of 1915. Tuition $250. No other charges of any kind. Enroll now. Booklet on request.

The Wright Company

DAYTON, OHIO New York OHicc:

I Pise St.

HUM

BURGESS- Military Aeroplane DUNNE

Furnished to

United States Great Britain Russia

Self-balancing

Self-steering

and

Non-capsizable

Form of wing gives an unprecedented arc of fire and range of observation.

Par excellence the weight and gun-carrying aeroplane of the World.

Tail-less and folding.

Enclosed nacelle with armored cockpit.

Speed range 40-80 miles per hour.

Climb 400 feet per minute.

Borgeis-Dunne No. 3 Delivered to U. S. ArmT at San Diefo, December 30

THE BURGESS COMPANY, Marblehead, Mass.

Sole licensees of the American-Dunne Patents

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