Aeronautics

Volume 16 - No. 6 - 1915 May

Table of Contents PDF Document


The American Magazine of Aeronautics was the first commercial magazine in the United States of America about national and international aviation. There were reports on patents and flight contests. The journal was published from July 1907 to July 1915. All pages from the years 1907 to 1915 are available with photos and illustrations as full text, for free.

However, if this form of presentation is inadequate, especially as regards the photos and illustrations, you can download all the editions as a PDF document with table of contents, photos and technical drawings, for a small fee. In order to search for topics and terms, please use also the available PDF documents. Please, use the free sample pdf document to check the quality of the PDF documents offered.



VOL. XVI. No. 6

MAY 30, 1915

15 Cents

iiiiiiiiiiii '''illilllillllllilililiiiiillliill

ERONflUTICS

li'il

m

The output of this model is sold for some weeks to come. Those desiring motors of this type should communicate with the factory at ^ Hammondsport for the necessary ^arrangements for future deliveries.

, All the important American Vecords are held by the Cur-tiss Motor.

Modern factory methods and large facilities have developed Curtiss Motors to the highest degree of efficiency.

Simplicity of design and construction permit overhauling or repairing by any good mechanic, no special knowledge being required.

Light in weight, yet not so light that durability and strength are sacrificed. The factor of safety is large in Curtiss Motors.

Curtiss Motor Co.

HAMMONDSPORT

NEW YORK

DETROIT, i TOLEDO, '* CLEVELAND,BUFFALOjPT. HURON, ALPENA, ■NIAGARA FALLS. | ST. IGNACEx .. ..y

" A LAKE TRIP FOR REST AND RECREATION 1 Have a real vacation on the Great Lakes, the most e->* ioyable and economical outing in America. The cocl like breezes, the ever-changing scenes along the shore, and the luxurious steamers of the D, & C. Line are positive guarantees that you will enjoy every minute of your trip, and return home refreshed and glad you went. Daily service between Detroit and Cleveland and Detroit and Buffalo. Four trips weekly from Toledo and Detroit to Mackinac Island and way ports. Two trips weekly, special steamer. Cleveland to Mackinac Island, no stops enroute except Detroit and Alpena. Special day trips between Detroit and Cleveland during July and August. Daily service between Toledo and Put-in-Bay. RAILROAD TICKETS AVAILABLE FOR TRAN i POR TATIOM on D. & C. Steamers between Detroit and Buffalo or Detroit and Cleveland either direction. Send two-cent stamp for illustrated pamphlet and Great Lakes map. Address L. G. Lewis. G.P. A.. Detroit. Mich.

Detroit & Cleveland Navigation Company Philip H. McMillan. Pres., A. A. Schantz. V. P. & G. M. All Steamers arrive and depart, Third Ave. wharf, Dc:.

STEWART VACUUM GASOLINE SYSTEM

Overcomes all gasoline ieed problems. Provides automatic, positive, even flow of gasoline to carburetor under all conditions.

What it is, and does:

It is a small tank 41* inches by 9 inches high; installed under hood at any convenient point above carburetor; and connected to the intake manifold rarburetor, and gasoline supply reservoir.

Suction ofthe motor draws gasoline from main reservoir to Stewart Vacuum Tank, from which it falls in a positive, even flow to carburetor.

Allows carburetor to be installed close up to intake manifold where it gets benefit of mo tor's heat, and where it can be most easily gotten at.

Works absolutely automatically, and once installed it can be forgotten.

Eliminates all of the uncertainties of pressure feed system, gravity tanks and tanks in cowl.

Curtiss Aeroplane now being equipped with Stewart Vacuum Gasoline System. Already regular equipment on 91 makes of automobiles.

Complete System, fl» f g\ (\(\ Ready to Inst all * 1U,UU

Stewart-Warner Speedometer Corporation

Executive Offices: 1998 Diversey Boulevard, Chicago, U. S. A.

IS Branches, IS Service Stations, in all cities, and large towns

The

U.S. Gov't

Uses Goodyear Balloons

Complete Balloons Made By Us

After 15 years devoted exclusively to the making of rubber goods, we have perfected the ideal fabric for balloons and aeroplanes.

We have the necessary experience and factory equipment to design and construct Spherical balloons, complete, of any size or type ; also to design and construct the gas bag of dirigibles.

The Goodyear experts act in a consulting capacity with manufacturers of aeronautic equipment. We work to specifications or design complete ourselves.

Win In Foreign Field

Kvery balloon bought by the U. S. Government the last three years has been made by Goodyear.

Goodyear Balloons won the American National Elimination Race out of Kansas City in 1'> 13, the International Race out of Paris in 1913, and the American Xational Elimination Race out of St. Louis in l'<14.

We also make aeroplane lires in any si7e—two new sizes, 20x4 inch and 2(>x5 inch.

G

ood/pyear

AKRON. OHIO

Rubberized Balloon Fabric and Accessories

Ask Questions—No Obligation

If you have balloon problems, consult with tin' Goodyear experts. This is no obligation to you. Write us. yivins.* specifications, and we will send complete information and prices.

Address Balloon Desk, 13b.

The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company

AKRON, OHIO

Makers of Goodyear Automobile Tires DISTRICT OFFICE AND WARI-HOUSK Jackson Avenue and Honeywell Street, Long Island City

(2320)

Published semimonthly in the best interests of Aeronautics by AERONAUTICS PRESS INC. 250 West 54th St.. New York

Telephone. Circle 2289 Cable. Aeronautics. NewY.rk

Entered as Second Class Mail Matter. September 22, 190S. under the Act of March 3. 187^>. S3.UH a year. 15 cents a copy.

Pcstage free in the United States. Hawaii, the Philippines and Porto Rico. 25 Cents extra for Canada and Mexico. 50 Cents extra for all other countries.

Make all checks and money orders free of exchange and payable to \EKU-NAUTICS PRESS.

ERNEST L. JONES Editor

M. B. SELLERS Technical Editor

HARRY SCHULTZ Model Editor

FRANK CASH Ass't Editor

The magazine is issued on the 15th and 30th of each month. All copy must be received 6 days before date of publication. If proof is to be shown, allowance must be made for receipt and return.

Subscribers will kindly notify this office if discontinuance is desired at the end of their subscription period, otherwise it will be assumed that their subscription is to be continued.

/

THE FIRST FLYING MODEL

[Euitor's Note.—The following two articles were written for Aeronautics in 1909. but were never before published.

Herr Kress died in Vienna, aged 77 years, on Feb. 24, 1913.]

not a model of a kite-flyer yet, only a physical experiment, which, however, pointed out clearly to me that a kite-flyer was possible as soon as a sufficiently light motor could be obtained. Now I was eager to build a real model of a kite-flyer. The picture of this model of 1877 shows the striking similarity to the modern monoplanes of Latham. Bleriot, etc. "A" shows the collapsible plane, "b" the elevation rudder, "c" the elastic sail air-screws, which rotate in opposite

HISTORY OF THE EVOLUTION OF MY FIRST FLYING MODEL OF A KITE FLYER IN 1887.

By Wilhelm Kress

In the beginning nf the 60s, induced by an article in a technical paper, I built small air screws of 30 ctm. diameter, which, like air-tops, would rise in the air by quick rotation. In the summer of 1864 I amused myself with my young nephew with flying kites made by myself. One day the wind was very low and I had to run a considerable distance in order to get the kite up. At this proceeding the idea struck me for the first time, that if I connected the kite with my air-screws and if the same were driven by a motor, the kite could rise in calm weather and independently move about.

But this would be a flying machine which would fly without a balloon. Until then I was only interested in the dirigible balloon. This new idea took so completely hold of me that I went straight to a watchmaker and ordered a very light watch-spring motor. In the meantime I made a plane of about Y\ sci. metre, connected the motor with the air-screw under the plane and mounted the whole on small wheels; in 14 days the apparatus was ready. But it proved at the different trials that the apparatus was too heavy in proportion to the motor: it would propel on the floor, but so slow that it could not be expected to rise into the air. All my efforts to obtain a smaller motor were in vain.

In 1873 1 again tried to make a model of a kite-flyer with two air-screws, as 1 was promised a suitable motor, but the promise was never kept. Finally, in the winter of 1876-77, 1 was induced through a discussion to make a new experiment with a rubber motor. I built for a preliminary trial a plane as large as a stork, fastened in back and front of it an airscrew, which revolved by means of a rubber band in opposite direction to each other.

To my delight this apparatus wo"bl when released from the hand, flv free through the room. Of course, it was

Aviatik: "How the Bird Flies, and How Man Will Fly.'' l'i|.=, Spielha'.'en and Schurich in Vienna.

directions to each other ,"d" is the bumper, '"e" the guiding rudder, "f" the runners. The apparatus will rise into the air from the floor or a long table and will take a gentle upward course, either straight or in a circle, just as the rudder is set. At that time we had no aeronautic literature whatever and 1 had no pattern for the construction of my model, which resulted and gradually ripened from the first thought in the summer of 1805.

In 1879 I took out German, French and Austro-Hungarian patents and called my invention an " Aeroveloce." As we had no suitable motors, the possibility of the kite-fl\er was not believed until recent years. Later on I built models with two and three planes, which were placed one behind another, independently, and also arranged one above the other, as well as models of screw and swing-flyers.*

Since March 15. 1880. almost thirty years. I had to fight antagonists and skeptics in my writings and public lectures for Ihe kite-flyer and my models 1 let fly over the heads of audiences in the halls

of Vienna, Berlin, Prague, London. St. Petersburg. Strasburg. etc. And now. when last summer ( 1909 I we could see Latham and Bleriot flying, my friends recollected my old model of 1877 and induced me to have my model photographed.

I am now old and tired, but I have at least the satisfaction of having the dream of my youth realized.

By Octave Chanute

William Kress, of Vienna, Austria, is a distinguished aviator and experimenter, whose career well illustrates the difficulties and disappointments which are encountered by inventors who are in advance of their contemporaries.

As early as 1873 and 1877 he was experimenting in aeronautics, writing papers and delivering lectures advocating the possibility of human flight, which lectures were later illustrated by rubber-driven models flying over the heads of the audience.

He contributed two valuable papers to the International Conference on Aerial Navigation in Chicago, in 1893, one on aeroplanes and one on the elastic screw propeller.

His efforts met with but scant encouragement, it being generally realized that motors existing up to 1890 were not sufficiently light in proportion to their power to promise actual human flight with a dynamic flying machine.

But when the gasoline motor had been developed to hitherto unprecedented lightness. Air. Kress built a full-sized machine with three tandem aeroplanes, measuring 1,011 square feet of sustaining surfaces, the whole mounted upon a float or scow and provided with a motor represented to he of 30 horse power. The entire apparatus weighed 1.870 pounds, including the aviator. It was completed in 1901 and absorbed all of Mr. Kress' personal resources.

It was experimented on an artificial lake near A"ienua, but the motor proved much weaker than had been represented. (Continued on page SS)

DIAGRAM SHOWING CONSTRUCTION OF THE MACMECHEN ZEPPELIN DESTROYER

THE MACMECHEN-KAMP ZEPPELIN DESTROYER

A new type of rigid dirigible is soon to lie shown to the world by T. R. Mac-Meclien, president of the Aeronautical Society of America. Mr. Maci\fechen has been in England for some months building the first of five ships that will serve the purpose of "Zeppelin Destroyers." They will be to the mammoth airship what the destroyer of the sea is to the dreadna ught.

A corporation of $5,01)0.000 has been formed, in which some of the most prominent men in England are interested. Mr. MacMechen is general manager, and Walter K. Kamp, of New York, the designer of the ship, is the superintendent of construction. With Wilbur R. Kimball are two other engineers employed on the proposition. (Jut-side of the blowers, which are made by the B. F. Sturtevant Co., the craft will be all-British.

Five rigid airships are about completed. These have a length of 236 feet and a maximum diameter of 28 feet. The capacity is 108,000 cubic feet. The bow is a "drop" center, departing from the true axis of the ship when taken finally to the rear. With all equipment and fuel and supplies the ship will have a range of 300 miles, with a crew of four men, to include a navigator, a gunner and two engineers.

There is one forward E. N. Y. motor of 75 h.p. and a 125-h.p. Green motor at the rear. These drive by direct cables universally mounted propellers. In addition there are four elevators on each side of the hull, and horizontal and vertical rudders at the stern to guide the craft.

The framing of the shell is of wood and is guyed transversely at each of 14 sections by steel cables radiating from a central steel ring like the spokes of a wheel to the 32 longitudinal girders and helical girders that run around the hull from bow to stern. There are as many sections as there are gas compartments, i. e.. 14. Over the wooden framing is an outer shell of 29 transverse girders that completely encircle the inner hull. This entire wooden shell is of the finest Canadian fir, which is wrapped around the frame in the same manner as a cigar is wrapped. The ends of all these wrappings lock into mahogany noses. Fine aluminum rivets and glue hold the spiral laminations together. Every piece of wood in the frame, including wings and rudders, is laminated. The 14 gas con-t-biers are of the best 3-ply rubberized

fabric of marvelously light weight. The outside skin is a specially aluminized cloth of still lighter weight.

The car is suspended by cables in an inverted "Y" formation from the top of 14 of the transverse girders which encircle the hull at each division between the gas containers. The car is part of the belly of the ship, to which it is so'idly bolted. The car contains the power plant 5, ventilating and heating

parative safety from harm and surety of purpose as to offense.

The whole ship will be capable of navigation from the captain's station, even to the starting, stopping and control of the motors, if so desired. Also the various gas compartments will all be controlled by tubes operated by the pilot.

The invention is patented in the United StiUs and i:. protected by patent appli-

systems for controlling the expansion and contraction of the gas. the navigating instruments, fuel tanks, etc.

The ship is made to ascend or descend without the loss of gas, by compressing or allowing the gas to expand. The compression is obtained through two Sturtevant aluminum blowers weighing only 9 pounds each, operated by each engine. Cold air may be blown into the compartments to compress the gas and lower its temperature for the reduction of lifting capacity: or warm exhaust from the engine is blown into these compartments, all danger of fire from this source being eliminated by expanding the exhaust gases in a special "spark" chamber fitted with asbestos plates and copper wire mesh screens to catch sparks. This has been thoroughly tested and proven to be absolutely certain in operation.

The speed is expected to be around 60 miles an hour and these destroyers will have a range of 10 hours. At full speed they will be able to travel 300 miles without replenishing fuel. They are more easily navigable than the monster Zeppelins and it is expected they will maneouvre about them with coin-

cations in Great Britain and its colonial possessions, France, Italy, Russia, Japan, Brazil, Argentine, Chili and Mexico.

A fine type of shed has been built for the housing of these ships. Numbers of these are being also built by the admiralty for their own use. The shed is 266 feet long, 50 feet wide and 60 feet high. The frame is covered with corrugated metal. Rails run the length of the shed for taking the ship out with electrically operated trolleys. On the roof is a meteorological station. These sheds are now completed.

()n the ground in one picture are seen some of the 14 big "wheels" to be set up in line around which the hull is built.

Stuart McDonald has just completed an experimental airboat. in which he has placed a 100-h.p. Curtiss motor. The boat has been taken to the lake for its preliminary try-out. but on account of the high winds and rough water have not been able to make its first test as yet. They are using the Benoist runway at Lincoln Park. Walter E. Lees, a recent graduate from the Curtiss school at San Diego, expects to fly the machine this season in passenger-carrying work.

THE PARISANO "PARAPLANE

Michael A. Parisano, of 1416 Stebbins avenue, Xew York, after years of experimenting with models, is now building an aeroplane incorporating the results of his experiments, with the expectation of meeting military requirements, which type is named the "Para-plane."

The use of the cylinder, as shown in

the drawing, is designed to increase the lifting capacity of his machine and at the same time insure longitudinal stability. It is claimed the machine will not "dive" and will glide at a small angle. The entire bottom of the cylinder is left out, as will be seen. There are two apertures in the top of the cylinder through which flows a stream

of air. When the machine is unbalanced there is a lessened resistance due to the aperture on that side, and a return to normal position is obtained. For deliberate banking, two ailerons are placed at the outside front edge of the wings.

By turning a small wheel beside the aviator's seat, both ends of the cydinder will be drawn down and make the machine act as a parachute. There are two controls for the usual purposes. The angle of incidence is also variable.

The machine has two motors, each coupled to a separate propeller, and it is figured that the machine can be flown with either one of the propellers alone in operation.

The wings are quick detachable. The engines and propellers are a unit and independent of the wings. With the four-wheel running gear, it is expected to be able to drive the machine along a street, steering with the wheel at the rear, the tail being collapsible and fold-able. The wings hang at the side when dismounted.

The apparatus has been patented in the L'nited States and foreign countries.

NIEUPORT 50 H. P. ONE-SEATER

This monoplane follows the general line of its predecessors, but exhibits some important modifications. Instead of the long central skid device by Edo-uard Nienport, the Morane type of chassis is used. The wheels are elastic-ally mounted and guided in their orientation by two hinged rods, in place of the slots usually employed.

The tail is supported, when at rest, hy a curved skid, which also acts as a brake. This arrangement puts more stress on the framework than the long skid arrangement mentioned above.

THE FIRST FLYING MODEL

{Continued from page A3) The apparatus gathered a good speed over the water, hut not enough to rise into the air; in making a turn it was caught by a side wind, capsized and sank to the bottom, Mr. Kress being nearly drowned. His funds were now-exhausted, the public was indifferent and he had to stop experimenting.

The motor then used weighed 28 pounds per nominal horse power. Since the recent improvements, reducing the weights to S and 10 pounds per horse power, Mr. Kress has published a pamphlet (1905) entitled "Aviatic, How the Bird Flies and How Man Will Fly," in which he gives a very interesting account of his experiments.

His friends have now inaugurated a fund which at last accounts amounted to 20,000 kronen, in order to enable him to try again.

 

i

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a

-

   

'<$:

if*-. •

41

NEWBERRY KILLED

Troy, X. Y., May 31.—George L. Newberry, aviator, of Kirkwood. X. Y., was fatally injured here this afternoon when an aeroplane with which he was giving an exhibition at a picnic, held in Rensselaer Park h.v the Troy police, fell from a height of 400 feet into Oakwood Cemetery. Newberry was extricated from the ruins of his machine and hur-

ried to a hospital, where he died in a few minutes.

Newberry made one successful flight and return to the park. Without alighting, he arose in the air again and new over the cemetery, in which the veterans were holding their Memorial Day exercises. He was at a height estimated at 400 feet, when there was a "lond explosion and the machine turned over and fell like a plummet to the earth."

CURTISS TRACTORS FOR SIGNAL CORPS

The photograph shows one of the Curtiss assembly rooms at Buffalo, showing a string of eight of the new army tractors being built for the U. S. Government. This is the first photograph of the new squadron recently purchased by the Government.

NAVAL MILITIA IN AERONAUTICS

Activity is being displayed in various quarters since the publication of the call to arms by Captain Mark L. Bristol, director of naval aeronautics.

At Cleveland, the organization (A. F. Nicklett, commander) has become active and appointed Harvey R. Kidney, a former Curtiss man, in charge of instruction. The class has 38 members, and all are studying hard to get the principles of flight and construction. In the membership are chauffeurs, auto mechanics, college engineering students and automobile testers. Meetings are held weekly. The aeronautical corps, when definitely formed, will be provided with two hydroaeroplanes, four aviator-officers, twelve mechanics and a commanding officer.

Naturally, they all take Aeronautics.

NEW BENOIST AIR BOAT

The new Benoist "safety-first" air-boat for 1915 is only a modification of the models gotten out in 1913 and 1914, with improvements in details, greater factor of safety and increased efficiency of material and parts. This machine is made in two models—a popular-priced two-place machine, equipped with a six-cyhnder Roberts motor, and a large four-place machine, equipped with a 90-h.p. Gyro.

The illustrations show the new model equipped with the 100-h.p. Roberts. This machine, with a passenger, got out of

the water easily within 200 feet from start and would stay up on half throttle. An idea of its wellnigh perfect balance can be gotten by examining the illustration, showing it in flight with passenger, operated by Jay Smith.

The method of mounting the engine section differs somewhat from the 1913 boat. This was designed by Tom Benoist in the spring of 1914. and it was found that these diamond struts were much more efficient than the old box strut type used on the old machine. A better system of chain adjustment is

used, which can be easily understood by examining the illustration, showing the transmission in detail. This machine was delivered the early part of May to J. E. Pepin of Lorain. Ohio, who has the contract for passenger carrying at Cedar Point this coming season. This is the second season that a Benoist machine will be seen there, as Tony Jan-nus used an old 1913 Benoist during the season of 1914 at Sandusky and Cedar Point. This old machine had gone through the complete season at St. Petersburg in the winter in 1913-14. And after being used at Cedar Point during the summer, with another old boat built in Ma}-, 1913, constituted the fleet of Jamais Bros, at Baltimore during the fall and winter of 1914. and at the present time is being used by Januus Bros, at San Diego. Cal.. and have been ever since the first of the year. The machine driven by Roger Jannus is over two years old. and has been used steadily in commercial passenger carrying service all that time, both winter and summer, which will give one an idea of the staying qualities of a well-built air boat.

Bud Morriss. a former Bleriot flyer, has ordered a new Benoist airboat, to be equipped with a 100-h.p. motor, for delivery in June. He expects to go into the passenger-carrying business on the Great Lakes this summer.

J. Val Strogh, of Albia. Iowa, has spent a week at the Benoist plant and accepted delivery on a little crosscountry exhibition tractor machine, in which he is installing a 1915 four-cylinder Roberts motor.

THE SMALL GOUPY BIPLANE

This little machine, with a spread of 6 in., already four years old, built for Yedrines when he piloted the Goupy. is excellent in design, but shows some poor work in details of construction.

For example, the aluminum sccket-for the struts, assembling of the cell on the fuselage by means of small bolts through the spars and struts, etc.

The dimensions are given on the drawing herewith.

George Stope, of St. Louis, and Chas. Lockwood. an aviator of Ft. Madison. Iowa, are preparing to open an airboat line between Madison and Rock Island, 111., with stops at Muskatine and at other points. They expect to do a regular passenger carrying business, similar to the Renoist air line operated in Florida last winter.

OjovPy

■I

THE A.B.C.

Mr .William A. Degoode. a prominent real estate man of Brooklyn, has associated himself in the production of the new A.B.C. type aeroplane designed by Messrs, John Carisi and Vincent J. Ruranelli for military use. Mr. Degoode. being convinced that the moment is ripe for large aeronautical activities, intends to push the building of this type of machine on a considerable scale, providing the trials of the first machine, a military biplane pusher, which will take place in a few weeks, demonstrate

the expected superiority of design and construction of the machine.

This machine is powered by a 100-h.p. A.B.C. motor, specially built, which it is claimed developed unexpected efficiency in trials. This motor is of the famous Austro Daimler type, being constructed of the highest-grade materials. The cylinders are bored from solid billets of chrome nickel steel, thereby effecting a considerable reduction in the weight of the motor. If the motor and machine work together as well as is

anticipated, duplicates will be built as are required.

The Canadian Aviation Co., Limited, of which Mr. W. A. Dean is president, has received permission from Major-General Hughes to make flights, and hopes to begin the instruction of pupils soon on a site east of the Royal Canadian Yacht Club building, at the Island. Three Toronto pupils, Thomas Webber, Mark Boyd and Fullerton Cleghorn, have been enrolled.

THE R. E. P. MONOPLANE

The R. E. P. monoplane is too well known to require a description in addition to the drawings here given.

The fuselage, pentagonal in front, triangular in rear, is built entirely of steel tubes. The wings are ash. The wing spars are hinged to the fuselage, permitting a freer motion in warping. The horizontal empennage is flat, with a slight negative angle of attack as in the Ponnier.

The machine is designed to be assembled and demounted quickly, which can be done in a few minutes.

C. A. Coey. of Chicago, is about to receive from Captain Bumbaugh, of Indianapolis, "what 1 believe to be the smallest passenger-carrying balloon in the world: you probably are aware of the fact that I own the largest one in the world—-'The Chicago."

"The new balloon will hold 9,000 cubic feet and 1 am having a private aerodrome built on my farm near Chicago, and I expect to have a great deal of fun this summer taking short trips. I believe it is the only private aerodrome in this country.''

TECHNICAL TALKS-By M. B. Sellers

EIFFEL'S "NOUVELLES RECHERCHES"

I shall here give a hrief account of some of the results which seem to me of most practical importance in M. Eiffel's reecnt work, Xoitvcllcs Rcchcrches sur la Resistance de I'Air et I'Aiiation.

In the study of the resistance offered by symmetrical bodies, it was found that for most bodies examined the coefficient of unit resistance, K (where R—KSV"), varied wdien the speed

varied. For some bodies there was no variation of K within the limits of the experiment. Spheres and some other bodies showed "two regimes" of resistance (see Aeronautics for March 30, 1915), the unit resistance being about twice as high at low speeds as at high speeds, and, as the speed was increased, passing from the first to the second regime at some critical speed, beyond

which K would be more or less constant.

This critical speed was lower the larger the sphere.

In the case of some other bodies K did not appear to change in this manner, in some cases remaining constant for all speeds employed—in some even increasing with the speed.

In using the co-efficient of resistance of any body, it is necessary to know for what speed or speeds the value taken holds good.

-fusiform Vodies-

I shall now give the unit resistance of some bodies examined:

Sphere.—Diameter 16 cm., K=.01 for all speeds above 14 metres per second: diam. 25 cm., K=.01 for speeds above 12 m/s: diameter 33 cm.. K=.01 for speeds above Id tn/s; that is. K is constant above critical speed for all sizes examined.

Disc.—K about constant for all speeds: =.07

Cup.—Hemispherical, concave toward wind, K=.0'> at 16 m/s and rises to .10 at 26 m/s (K variable throughout) ; same, convex toward wind, K nearly constant, about .02, from 6 m/s to 30 m/s. the highest speed employed.

Cylinder.—Short. H=D, side to wind: cylinders, like spheres, have a "critical speed"; K about constant at .023 from 12 m/s up. For long cylinders K is less than .02 beyond 20 m/s.

Wires.—K is independent of diameter; at 4 m.'s it is .062, and diminishes gradually till at 14 m/s it is .OSS; increasing again gradually, and at 30 m/s it is .065.

{Continued on page 90)

t---

AERONAUTICS' DATA SHEET No. 16

COMPRESSION STRENGTHS SHELBY SEAMLESS STEEL TUBING FOR AERONAUTICAL PURPOSES

(National Tube Company)

Tensile Strength Load to in lbs. Elongation

Kind of Steel

 

Size

Length

Buckle

per sq. in.

2"

8"

.17 Carbon

r

x20 ga.

12"

7.430

75.000

18.

7.8

     

24"

6,410

 

"

"

"

r

x22 ga.

12"

4,590

58,100

23.5

12.1

"

   

24"

4.480

"

"

■*

 

X'

x20 ga.

12"

4.410

62,100

28.5

15.5

"

 

24"

4,590

"

"

"

   

x22 ga.

U"

3,010

60,700

22.5

12.3

"

24"

3.730

"

"

"

.30 to .40Crbn.

V

'x20 ga.

12"

6,900

78.000

15.

7.6

     

24"

6.3o0

     
 

1

'x22 ga.

12"

5,740

79,000

11.5

6.5

"

 

24"

5,200

 

"

"

   

'x20 ga.

12"

6,270

89.000

10.

4.

"

 

24"

4,040

   

"

3;/,% Nickel

1

'x22 ga.

12"

9,160

120,000

12.5

7.1

   

24"

8,310

     

TELESCOPING SIZES. For telescoping, an allowance of not less than .005 inch should be made on all diameters 5.5 inch and smaller in lengths of from 5 to 6 inches of the O. D. telescoping tube; and for greater lengths the allowance should be increased to provide for lack of straightness in tube.

POUNDS (AVDP.) IN KILOGRAMS

lbs. |

Kllogr.

lbs.

Kilogr.

lbs. |

Kilogr.

lbs.

Kilogr.

to J=>

Kllogr.

S3

Kilogr.

i

0,453»

21

9,5250

41

18,5974

61

27,669,

81

36,7410

IOI

45,812,

2

o,907a

22

9,9794

42

19,050,

62

28,122,

82

37,194.

102

46,266,

3

i.36°s

23

10,432,

43

19.504s

63

28,576,

83

37,648,

103

46,720,

4

1,814,

24

10,886.

44

19,958,

64

29,029,

84

38,101,

IO4

47,173,

5

=.=68,

25

n,339s

45

20,411,

65

29,483,

85

38,555.

105

47,627,

6

2,72is

26

11,7934

46

20,865,

66

=9,937,

86

39,009,

106

48,080,

7

3.i75i

27

12,247,

47

21,318,

67

30,390,

87

39.462,

107

48.534s

8

3,628,

28

12,700,

48

2i,772s

68

30,844,

88

39,916,

108

48,988,

9

4.082,

29

!3,i54!

49

22,226,

69

31,297,

89

40,369,

IO9

49.4417

:o

4,535i

30

13,607,

50

22,679,

70

.1,751.

90

40,823,

no

49.895.

ii

4.989s

31

14,0614

51

23,133.

71

32,2«5i

91

41,276,

III

50,348,

12

5,443i

32

M.5i5o

52

23,586,

72

32,658,

92

41,730,

112

50,802,

13

5,896,

33

14,968,

53

24,040,

73

33,"2,

93

42,184,

"3

51,256,

H

6,350,

34

15,422,

54

24,4941

74

33,565,

94

42,637,

114

51,709.

■5

6.803,

35

15,875.

55

24,947,

75

34,oi9s

95

43091,

115

52,163,

16

7,257s

36

16,3294

56

25 401,

76

34,473,

96

43,544,

Ilfl

52.616,

17

7,7i 11

37

■6,783,

57

25,854,

77

34,926,

97

43,998,

117

53.070,

18

8,164,

38

17,236,

58

26,808,

78

35,380,

9S

44,452,

118

53.5=3.

■9

8,618,

39

17,690,

59

26,762,

79

35,833.

99

44,905,

119

53,977,

20

9,071,

40

l8,!43s

60

27,215.

80

36,287,

100

45,359,

120

54,431.

V____)

saw

FA

CURTISS

/fx

FACILITIES

This shows one section of the new steel factory. It is 300 ft. long and 100 ft. wide. Another section of equal size is now under construction. Curtiss Aeroplanes of tractor and pusher type for land and water are built here under ideal conditions. P i

INFORMATION ON REQUEST

'he Curtiss Aeroplane Co-Buffalo, New York

WIRE

We make an extra high grade plated finish wire for aviators' use.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ADDRESS

John A. Roebling's Sons Co.

The Thomas

Continues to Make Records

On February 2", at Ithaca. N.Y., the Thomas Tractor Biplane, with three men and four hours' fuel aboard, climbed 4,000 ft. in 10 min Average speed —81-1 m.p.h. Slow speed down to 38 m.p.h. Showed high degree of inherent stability.

Thomas School

Offers exceptional facilities — land and water. Best of instructors and equipment. Write.for "Opportunity" Booklet Xo. Ii'.

THOMAS BROS. AEROPLANE CO., Inc., Ithaca, N.Y.

ROBERTS

You Couldn't Expect More Value

100 H.P. 200 H.P.

340 lbs. 690 lbs.

You Couldn't Get More Satisfaction

- $1,250

- $1,850

A "Q-D" Motor —Simple- No Vibration —10 Hour Test for Every Motor Guaranteed to Stand More Abuse and Heavy Work with Less Attention than Any Other Motor. ALL IT WANTS IS GASOLINE AND SPARK

ROBERTS MOTOR MANUFACTURING COMPANY

300 Roberts Motor Block SANDUSKY, OHIO, U. S. A.

MOTORS

OF AMERICA 29 West 39th Street. New York

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

LEE S. BURRIDGE FUND.

Through a liberal bequest made by the late Sir. Lee S. Burridge, The Aeronautical Society is in possession of a fund which has been greatly desired since its inception. While the bequest was made in fee simple, those closely associated with Air. Ilurridge knew of his desire to permanently record the work of the society, and therefore the directors have established as a memorial the Lee S. Burridge fund for publishing the transactions and papers of the society.

PEORIA AERO CLUB ACTIVE

The Aircraft Club of Peoria has been reorganized unde the name Peoria Aero Club"; $5,000 capital stock.

At a meeting recently held Alfred W. Harris was elected president; W. H. Webster, secretary, and W. H. Ballance, treasurer.

The club will hold an aero meet July 3d. at which time it is figuring on having seven land machines, seven water machines, six balloons and possibly a dirigible.

Air. Harris has just purchased a four-passenger Gyro motored mahogany hull Benoist flying boat, and will attempt to make a non-stop flight from Chicago to Peoria, following the Illinois-Michigan Canal and Illinois River.

_ The Mississippi Power Boat Association will hold their regatta on the Mississippi River at Hannibal. Mo., this year, on July 5. 6. 7. They are expecting to have at least three airboats, and will put up several hundred dollars in prizes for passenger carrying, speed and endurance.

The Aero Club of Davton, Ohio, an affiliated club of the Aero Club of America as well as the International Aeroplane Club, also of Dayton, is "out of business." according to the postmaster of the birthplace of aviation.

And with a real industry!

"Club died and flew to heaven two years ago; honorable death; no lives lost and no debts left behind."—The former president. R. M. Bird.

And still they come!

AERO CLUB OF PENNSYLVANIA

The monthly meeting of the club was held in the Green Room of the Bellevue-Startford Hotel, Philadelphia, evening, on Alay 21, and the increasing interest of the members was shown by the much larger attendance than usual. Capt. Hugh L. Willoughby. retired naval officer and hydroaeroplane builder, gave an informal talk on the aeroplane as a protective measure against submarine attack. Capt. Willoughby's most interesting statement was as follows ; "Few-people see the possibilities that there are in the aeroplane for locating submarines and protecting ships. A battleship is almost helpless against a torpedo. The only protective measure that it seems possible to develop now is the aeroplane. If the Lusitania had been guarded from the air above, the terrific disaster of its sinking might have been avoided."

A call was issued by President Stein-metz, of the club, requesting every licensed aviator in the Philadelphia "air zone" to report at once to the officers of the club in order that proper preparations can be made for the National Aeroplane Contest which opens on July 4th.

To aid the cause, action was taken by the club to raise a fund of $1,000 for the erection of a large hangar. The club augmented the fund to the extent of $100, and up to date several more substantial subscriptions have been received. It is hoped that definite action can be taken and work started so that the hangar be ready for use by visiting aviators during the competition.

Through the efforts of President Steinmetz and ex-President Wynne, of the club. Secretary Daniels, of the Navy, has granted the Aero Club of Penn-vania full permission to use a plot of ground, just east of the marine barracks, at the League Island Navy Yard, for the erection of the club hangar, repair shop and as an official landing station for all aircraft arriving in or departing from the city.

Admiral Benson, former commandant at the League Island Navy Yard, and now detailed on most important work in Washington, strongly approved the recommendation to the Secretary of the Navy that the League Island Yard become one of the official stations for visiting aviators.

The site is ideal, contains about 20 acres, concrete wharf, railroad tracks and shop facilities for repairs. It is

the belief that many tests of aircraft for naval use will later on be made at this station. Being situated directly on the Delaware River and with a fine beach, the station is equally adapted for flying boats as well as land type machines, and while the contemplated hangar will house at least two or three 'planes, the club members trust that the unusual opportunities afforded by this field will prove such an attraction that ether hangars will be necessary.

Visiting members of the Philadelphia Aero Club who were present at the meeting reported that the tractor bi-"lane upon which they have been working for some tune is about ready for test flights.

Designed hy Percy Pierce and fellow members of the junior organization, there is every reason to think that the plane should prove a success. It will be used principally as a training 'plane for the members of the club.

TECHNICAL TALKS

{Co/ifmrtct/ from page SS)

Inclined Wires.—A wire inclined at 30° (with horizontal) has a resistance of 2(1% of its resistance when normal. At 45" its resistance is 48%, and at 60' it is 72% of normal. (Dr. Stanton has found that vibration does not increase the resistance of a wire. These wires, however, did not vibrate.)

The resistance of cables is slightly higher than that of wires: K~=07 for 16 m/s. What has been said about wires applies to cables.

Struts.—Fig. 1 shows the struts; No. 2, 74 by 25 mm., gave least K; K=.(X)7 beyond 14 m/s. No I was slightly higher. K=.01. No. 3 showed IC=035 at 30 m/s, and more at lower speeds. Inclining No. 3 decreased its resistance considerably, but inclining No. 2 decreased resistance very little.

Fusiform Bodies.—See Fig. 2. No.

4, 674 bv 120 mm., gave least value of K, =008 at 24 m/s. The value of K increased in the following order: 4. 1. 2.

5, 3. However, form 2 would be best for a dirigible because the ratio of cubic contents to the resistance would be greater than for the others.

( To be continued.)

MARY PICKFORD FLIES

"It wasn't scary enough!" said winsome little Mary Pickford after Glenn Martin had whirled her aloft 2.500 feet above Los Angeles on May 25. "'It was glorious ! But it wasn't scary enough !"

Two of Air. August Freese's daughters also went aloft, along with Senor Caxialoa and several others. And as they circled about. Aliss Pickford described the experience. "Afraid? Not a bit of it!" she laughed. "I wish we had gone right on up 6,000 feet, maybe. And 1 just begged Glenn to do some fancy stunts. But he wouldn't. Still, it was wondei ful!"

THE = HUDSON-WRIGHT AERO CO.

Announce the opening of their Flying School June Tenth, at 132nd Street and Hudson River.

Office: 242 W. 59th St. NEW YORK

THE WRIGHT FLYING BOAT

The

Wright

Company

(The

Wright

Patents)

THE NEW WRIGHT AEROPLANES

For sport, exhibition or military use, over land or water now embody the improvements that have been suggested by the experiments quietly conducted during the past ten years.

THE WRIGHT FLYING SCHOOL

Located at Dayton opens May 1st, for the season of 1915. Tuition $250. No other charges of any kind. Enroll now. Booklet on request.

The Wright Company

DAYTON, OHIO New York OHice: 11 Pio

m

Safest and Most Practical

THE P A F! A PLANE

A few of its patented lU. S. and foreign 1 features; — Inherent Stability, Dual Motors. Controls and Propellers which can be worked independent of each other. Propellers and Control so arranged that machine will fly just as readily with a single Propeller, Greater Lifting Power, Changeable Angle of Incidence.

Especially Designed for Governmental and Private Use Literature on request PAR1SANO AERIAL NAVIGATION CO. OF AMERICA. INC. 220 West 42nd Street New York City

EIFFEL'

T'antUtitt ty I.hut cum C H 5 A.i; at Can,I'utter

Resistance of the Air and Aviation IN ENGLISH

Magnificent Quarlo Volume, Cloth. 242 pp. 27 LARCE PLATES AND TABLE OF POLAR DIAGRAMS 1913 ENLARGED EDITION

C*rf— W IRVDIC CHAMBERS, ol i luhW tnd u ,.rr 4—...bl. lor h> .

Ttt "SCIENTIFIC A

PRICE. $ 10. EXPRESS PAID

AERONAUTICS. 250 W. 54th STREET NEW YORK

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Aeronautical Cloth

NAIAD

J

+ +

+ + +

+

AND

Aero Varnish

+ +

+

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We were the first in the field, +

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and the test of time is proving + that our product is the best. +

•fr Samole Book A-6, Dala aod Prices oq Request +

| The C. E. Conover Co.

J MANUFACTURERS

% 101 Franklin Street, New York | *++++++++++++++++*++++++++++++

AERONAUTICS' DATA SHEET

No. 17

O

COMPOUND UNITS

Symbols Continental Units

gr/i-m gram per centimeter

kg/ni kilogram per meter

kg/km kilogram per kilometer

kg/qcm kilogram per square centimeter

kg/h:i kilopram per hectar

kg/Morgcn kilogram per Morgen

I /m* metric loo per square meter

American Equivalents

0 0055 lb. per in. 0 055 lb. per in. 3.54 lb. per mile

kg/m> kE/bJ t/m*

kg/h.p. kg/t

kgm/kg kgm 'qt-ni

t/km t-km

kilogram per cubic meter kilogram per hectoliter metric loo per cuhic meter

kilogram per Continental

horsepower kilogram per metric too

kilogram-meter per kilogram kilogram-meter per square centimeter

metric ton per kilometer metric ton-kilometer

Logarithms or Factors of Equivalence

3.74816 2 74816 0 54900

14 22 lb. per sq. in. 1.15300

O.S9 1b. per acre 1.94939

3 49 lb. prr acre 0 54282 0 102 short tons per

sq. Tt. T.01033

0 002 lb. per cu. ft. 2 79518

0 0S3 lb per gallon 2 91907

62.4 lb. per cu. ft. 1 79518

2.23 lb. per American

hp. 0 34830

2 lb. per short too 0 30103

3 28 ft -lb per lb. 0 51587 46 58 ft-lb. per sq.

1 77 short tons per mile 0 24797 0.6849 short ton-milea I 83562

O

Fr/m M/m Fr/t

Franc per meter Mark per meter Fraoc per metric ton

0 058 cents per ft. 0 072 cents per ft. $0.175 per short Iod

2 76342 2.85733 1.24303

O

M/t

Mark per metric ton

$0 216 per short too

1.33445

Fr/qm

Franc per square meter

SO OlSpersq. ft.

2.25527

M/qin

Mark per square meter

SO 022 per eq ft.

2 34242

Fr/cbm

Franc per cubic meter

SO 0054 per cu. ft

3 73239

M/ebm

Mark per cubic meter

SO 0067 per cu ft

3 82607

Fr/lia

Franc per hectar

SO 078 per acre

2 89209

M/Morgen

Mark per Morgen

SO 36 per acre

1 55630

Fr/h.p.

Franc per Continental horse-

$0 195 per American

 
 

power

hp.

T 29003

M/h p.

Mark per Continental horse-

$0,241 per AmericaD

 
 

power

hp.

I 3S201

Ft, Cal

Franc per calorie

SO 04S per B.t.u.

2.6S124

M/WE

Mark per Warmeeinheit

SO 060 per B.t.u

2 77S15

Fr/t-km

Frane per ton-kilometer

SO 2S1 per short too-

 
   

mile

T 44S70

M /t-km

Mark per ton-kilometer

SO 347 per ehort Iod-

 
 

mile

T.54032

Fr/kg

Franc per kilogram

S0.0S7 per lb.

2 93951

M/kg

Mark per kilogram

S0.10S per lb.

T 03342

Heat Units

   

Calorie

= WE (Warmeeinheit)

3.96S B.t.u.

0 59857

C/kg

Calorie per kilogram

1 .SO B t.u per lb.

0.25527

WE/kg

WurmeeiDheit per kilogram

1 80 B t.u. per lb.

0 25527

C/qm

Calorie per square meter

0.368 B t.u. per sq ft.

T 56584

WE/qm

Warmeeinheit, per square meter 0 36S B t.u per sq. ft.

1.56584

C/cbm

Calorie per cubic meter

0 112 B t.u. per cu ft.

I.04921

WE/chm

Warmeeinheit per cubic meter

0 112 B.t.u. per cu ft.

I 04921

[Journal, Am. Soc. Mech. Eng., May, 1913]

WRIGHT-CURTISS CASE REOPENS

The next move in the suit of the Wright Co. vs. the Curtiss Aeroplane Co. is now the trial of the cause on its merits, in final hearing, hefore Judge Hlazel in the U. S. District Court at Buffalo, X. Y.. commencing June 21.

Motion made by the plaintiff's counsel, H. A. Totilmin, of Dayton, who has been in this litigation since (he beginning, for argument on affidavits for

the issuance of a preliminary injunction was denied on May 11. Judge Hazel rendered the first opinion in the previous action in this famous case.

AVIATORS WANTED!

Aviators with machines at liberty are asked to communicate permanent address to Aeronautics.

Inquiries for aviators to rly exhibition dates are now on hand and coming.

Give fair references when writing, if not personally acquainted.

NEW COMPANIES

The Chicago Aero Works, established in 1909, has been incorporated (April, 1915) as an Illinois corporation. The officer are : President. Herbert S. Ren-ton ; vice-president, Maximillian Stupar; secretary, Antonia Renton; treasurer, Stanley H. Renton.

The offices of the company are at 143 Xorth Wabash avenue. Chicago. They have made practically all kinds of aeroplanes, from monoplanes to flying boats. However, they specialize in the Stupar Military Tractor Biplane. One of these tractors flew constantly for two seasons without breakage of an}' kind, and Earl Daugherty is now successfully flying another in California. They also deal in supplies, models, etc.

Wittemann Aircraft Co., airships, aeroplanes, motors, machinery; $300,000; James F. Middledith. Paul W. and Chas. R. Wittemann, 17 Ocean Terrace, Sta-pleton, S. I., X. V.

Edwards Comnion-Scjiise Aero,plane Co.. Tell City, hid.; capital. $2,000; to manufacture aeroplanes; directors. Chas. Herr. C. R. Clark, Louis Stamp and others.

rj E R O MART

WANT TO BUY an 80-li.p. Gnome or an SO or 90-li.p. Curtiss. Address John Weaver, c/o Aeronautics.

FOR SALE—Detroit motor, 30 h.p.. Bosch magneto, special Kingston carburetor, special mountings adaptable to monoplane. LTsed one hour, guaranteed better than new. $100.00 cash. H, c/o Aeronautics.

WAXTED—An old and, possibly, a wrecked aeroplane with motor at a fair price? Same is desired for the use only in the laboratory for class demonstration, and not for flying purposes. Address Box 146, X. D. Agricultural College. N. Dak.

4-CYLIXDER 50-h.p. Roberts with propeller hub and Bosch magneto, $450.00, thoroughly overhauled and guaranteed. Address R, c/o Aeronautics. 2t

6-CYLIXDER 80-h.p. Maximotor in fine condition. Complete with Mea magneto and propeller hub, $525.00, taken in trade on a new Roberts. Address R, c/o Aeronautics. 2t

FOR SALE—XEW $2,750 FRONTIER S-CYLIXDER S0-H.F. AEROPLANE MOTOR. GUARANTEED PERFECT. SACRIFICE, $050. COOKE. 127 WEST 64TH STREET, NEW YORK. 2t

FOR SALE—At the right price, one Baldwin machine with 50-h.p. Gnome. Good as new. J. W.. care Aeronautics.

WANTED — .Mechanic for Curtiss machine. J. \V„ care Aeronautics.

Page 93

BALLOONS

Airships, Aeroplanes, Gas Generators, Safety Balloons, Aeroplanes and Airships. Stevens' Ba MADISON SQUARE,

Packs, Parachutes. Exhibitions furnished with loons used by 95 of American and Canadian Clubs. BOX 181, NEW YORK

Aeronaut LEO STEVENS

PATENTS

THAT PROTECT AND PAY

Books and Advice Free

Send sketch or mntUM fur search. Highest references. Rest Results. Prumptncss Assured.

WATSON E. COLEMAN, Patent Lawyer

624 F Street, N. W. Washington, D. C.

Manufacturers want me to send them patents on useful inventions. Send me at once drawing and description of your invention and I will give you an honest report as to securing a patent and whether 1 can assist you selling the patent. Highest references. Established 25 ye; Personal attention in all cases.

WM. N. MOORE

PATENTS

in ears.

Loan and Trust Building

Washington, D. C.

BALDWIN

■Balloons Dirigibles Fabrics Motors

Box 78, Madison Sq. P.O., New York

BALLOOiNS DIRIGIBLES

Records prove we build tbe best Balloons in America. Nine 1st prizes. Three 2ml, anrl Two 3rd prizes out of fourteen Woiid-wide Contests.

Write for prices anil particulars.

HONEYWELL BALLOON CO. 4460 Chouleau St. Louis, Mo.

AERONAUTICS

= The Leading British Weekly = E Journal Devoted to theTechnique E E and Industry of Aeronautics =

= (FOUNDED 1907) =

E 5 'early Subscription: E

E Two Dollars Ten Cents. Post Free ~

— (.T/ojiey Orders Only) ^

■Head Office:

= 170 Fleet Street - - London, E. C. = = American Office: 250 Wesl 54th Slreel, New York E

nlllliiiiiilllllllllliililiiiiiliiiliiiiilllilililllllliiiir

PATENTS

Frederick W. Barker

Attorney and Expert in PATENTS, TRADE MARKS AND DESIGNS 28 Years in Practice

Coses prc]>uved and prosecuted ivith the greatest care and thoroughness, to ensure broad .'cope and validity

Direct Connections in all Foreign Countries

P. O. Box 139, Times Square Station, New York City

PATENTS

C. L. PARKER

Fx-member Examining Corp., II. S. Patent Odlea

Altorney-al-Law *od Solicitor of Paleols

American and foreign patents secured promptly and with special regard to the complete legal protection ot the invention. Handbook for inventors sent upon request. 30 McGill Bide. WASHINGTON. D. C.

Charavay Propellers

For Efficiency

THE AIRCRAFT CO., Inc. 1733 Broadway, New York

Sole Manufacturers of Sloane Aeroplanes

DON'T wtite us un'ess

v_ * you are interested in a reliable, efficient and economic at power plant. That is the only kind we build. Four sizes. Reasonable Prices

Kemp Machine Works

Muncie, Ind.

r

BEN0IST «c—

Aeroplanes and Flying Boats

BENOIST AEROPLANE CO., Inc. Factory and Office 341 S. St. Louis Avenue

CHICAGO. ILL.

THE U. S. NAVY USES

^Because they are the best by a large measure and Proved Best by test and official report, •j Others use Plain Paragons because they are not only best but also cheapest. <jFor Efficiency-For Economy, investigate Paragons. No charge for information—No pay but for results. <I\Ye have the only propeller factory in America. Lar:-;>- stock. Quick shipments.

AMERICAN PROPELLER CO., 243-249 East Hamburg St., Baltimore, Md.

...........................................................,.........................PARAGON PROPELLERS EXCLUSIVELY

AERONAUTICS' DATA SHEET No. 13

O

O

o

TRADE DIRECTORY (Cont'd)

WIRE AND CABLE

American .steel & Wire Co., Commercial National Hank Bids.,

Chicago, 111. Roebling's, .1. A., Sons Co.. Trenton, N. J.

MISCELLANEOUS

American Brass Co., Waterb iry. Conn. (Brass, bronze, German silver in sheet, wire, rods, brazed tubes, etc.)

Brnze Carbureter Co., 250 ft lutli St., Newark, N. J. (Carbureter hot air outfits, carbureter tubing, connections, check valves, flexible metal tubing, conduits, push and pull coils, flexible shafting and wire covering.!

Bretz, J. S., Co., 250 W. 54th S:., New York. (P.owden wire.)

Bind High Compression King Co., Roekford, ill.

Connecticut Tel. & Elec. Co., Meriden, Conn. (Automatic igniter systems, terminals for aero motors.)

Draeger Oxygen Apparatus Co., 422 First Ave., Pittsburgh, Pa. (Make inhalators.)

Hartford Machine Screw Co., Hartford. Conn. ("Master" spark plugs, screw maehinerv.)

Hecht's .Magneto Exchange, 2P.0 YV". 40th St., New York. (Magneto repairing.)

Herz & Co., 245 W 55th St., New York. I Spark plug "Mercedes.")

Jolins-Manville Co., H. Y\'., Madison Ave. and list St., New

York. (Spark plugs.) Linde Air Products Co., 42d St. Bklg., New York. (Oxygen.) National Sales Co., 45 Milk St., Boston, Mass. (Ellis Gas

Purifier.)

Pawtncket Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, II. I. (Bolts, cold punched mils, special machinery from customer's patterns.)

Robinson-Roders Co.. 27 N. J. R. R. Ave., Newark, N. J. C'llanasilk" life preservers.!

Smith, W. R., & Co., 30(1 YV. 52d St., New Y'ork. (Repairs and all machine work.)

Spalding, A. G. & Bros., 520 Fifth Ave., New York. (Helmets and sport goods and clothing.)

Sperry Gyroscope Co., 12(i Nassau St., Brooklyn. N. Y.

Steinmetz Devices Co., Fourth and Market Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. \ 1

Washington Aeroplane Co., SOD Water St. S.W., Washington, D. C. (Columbia universal control.)

Whitney Mfg. Co., Hartford, Conn. (Chains, milling machines, machine keys and cutters.)

Whitaker, Morris W., 1 Madison Ave., New Y'ork. (Naval architect.)

ADDITIONS TO LIST

CARBURETORS

Johns-Manville Co., H. YV., Madison Ave. and 41st St., New York.

BOOKS

L

Send for new and complete catalogue

AERONAUTICS, 250 West 54th Stieel, NEW YORK

, 250 West 54th Street, NEW YORK j

JUST OUT^1

FLEXOGLASS FOR WINDSHIELDS

A new material, suitable for windshields and windows on aeroplanes and flying boats has been put on the market by a firm in Xew York, tinder the name "Hexoglass." This is similar in appearance only to celluloid. It is non-combustible, proof against oil, alcohol, benzine or gasoline. It will not fade, is non-breakable, and can be glued, sewn or nailed. It can be procured in most any thickness that would be required. The same firm also imports balloon and

airship cloth, as well as aeroplane, fabric in linen or cotton, natural or bleached, heavy or light weight, and with remarkable strength, due to the quadrille feature, which eliminates ripping. Samples can be had from the Rose & Frank Co., 136 West 21st street. New York.

THE USED AEROPLANE QUESTION

Plans are already being made to dispose of the thousands of cars used in the war by the German armies. The

cars discharged from military service! are to be taken over by a special com-l pany, repaired and slowly put on theJ market during a three-year period. What of the aeroplanes?

STEVENS BUILDS POCKET AIRSHIP

A. Leo. Stevens & Company, the "company" being about 30 lbs. heavier and of the feminine gender, present compliments and advise the building of a new type, the Yest-Pocket Airship. One of these will be used at Palisade Park during this season. The pilot, Frank Goodale, has this apparatus sol constructed that he can fold it up veryl nicely, put it in his wallet, and one! would never know he had an airship with him. He inflates from a pocketl tube of a new compressed gas and starts! on his aerial journey

Goodale has been re-engaged at Palisade and is having a new airship oi more generous dimensions, built bjl Stevens, with which to give visible ex-l hibitions over and above Grant's TombJ

Remember, ladies and gentlemen, the big show in the main tent!—controlling "the largest flock of livers in America'! - -hurl themselves into space, 3,000 feed in the air. from a speeding aeroplane"—I "descend to earth by the aid of a Stev-J ens 'Safety Pack'"—"the greatest on the great"—this way, ladiesandgemmenJ to the T.ig Show! Yes, madam, buy! your ticket here—the free show has jusB concluded. This way, all a-b-o-a-r-d ! 1

ON THE DEATH OF LIEUtJ STOLZ

Lieutenant Stolz was at about an altitude of 100 feet, when the machine sud-l denly nose-dived and struck the wateij almost end on. Stolz's skull was fracJ tured and death was undoubtedly in-l stantaneous. The rescuing party was oil hand immediately, and the doctor ap-l plied restoratives within ten minutea after the accident, although it was fell! at the time that they would be of no! avail. The machine was practically a new hydroaeroplane of the Curtiss type, and upon examination after the accident seemed to be in good condition in every way and all the controls intact.

A board is now investigating the accident.

Walter Banning, of Lorain, Ohio, was at the Benoist plant last week, and on seeing the tests of J. E. Pepin's machine, equipped with a 100-h.p. Roberts' motor, ordered a duplicate for his own use, with the understanding that it was to be delivered by the first of June.

L. Q. Day, of Gibson City, 111., a licensed pilot from the Wright school has ordered a little Benoist tractor exhibition machine, to he equipped with radial motor. He expects delivery within the next ten days and is going into exhibition business. Dav is 17 years old, a student at the Illinois State University and probably the youngest licensed aem pilot in the world.

Page 95

INFLUENCE OF SIDE WIND ON VELOCITY AND DIRECTION OF FLIGHT

25 30

35 40 45 50

I. Angle of wind 30

Velocity . offllRbt

meters per sec.

A I E

75,0 23,8 I3,= 9.1 6,9 5,0 4 7 4.0 3,5 3,1

=,59 6,30 10,95 15,84 = 0,S=

=5,79 30,75 35.76 40,76 45,76

126,3 6,20

75,°' 5,54 38,3 8,07 =3,8 12,39 17,0 17,10 13,= =1.90 10.7 26,Sl 9," 31-7=

7.8 36,70

6.9 41-64

136,8 10.95 in,7 8,07 , 75,o 7,77 , 46,9 10,27 : -32.0 14,r6 =5,8,18,59 18,823,25 15.5 28,05 ■3,23=,S6 1I,5|37,78

140,9 15,84 ■=6,= 13,39 103,1 10,27 75.0 10,35 52 5 '2,6l 38.3 "6,14 =9.5,20,31

23.8 24,78

19.9 29,39 '7,0(34, '9

• I 143.1 =0,82 '33,0 17,10 I18.0] 14,16 97,5,12,61 75,o,'2,94 56,3 15,03 43,' 18,29 34,3 22,19 28,2 26,46 23,8[30,98

45

A I E

A I E

'44,4 =5,79 136,S 21,90 126,2 'S,59 III,7 16,14 93,7 15,03 75,0 15,53 59,0 17,50 46,9 20,54 38.3 =4,=o 32,0,28,32

■45,3 30,75 139,3 =6,Sl '3I,= 23,25 120,5 20,31 106,9 '8,29 91,0,17,50 75,o IS.I2 61,0 20,00 50,0 22,84 41,6126,36

146,0 '40,9 '34,5 126,2 "5,7 103,1 89,0 75,0 62,6 52,5,

35,76 j',72 28,05 24,78 22,19 =0,54 20,00 =0,71

'46,5 40,76 1 142,2 36,70 '36,8 32,86 130,1 29,39 121,8 26,46 111,7 =4,=o 100.0 22,84 87.41=2,52 75,o'23,29 I, 63,9=5,05 1

146,9 143,1 139,5 133,0

1=6,2

118,0 108,4 97.5 86,1 75,0

45,76 41,64

37,7S 34,'9 30,98 28,32 26,36 25,22 25,05 25,88

II. Angle of wind 60

15

A E

25 30 35 40 45 50

•

60,0 5,00

30,0 8,66

■9.' '3,=3

13,9 18,02

10,9 22.90 23,4

8,9 27,84 19,1

7.6 32,80 16,1

6,6 37,76 13,9

5,8 42,7:

8,66 10,00 13,23 17.32 21.79 26,46 31,23 36,06 40,94

5,2 47,70 I 10,9 ]45,82

90,0 60,0 40,9 30,0

100.9113,23 79.ijl3.23

60.0 15.00

46.1 18,03 36.6l21.79

30.0 =5,9S 25,3 30,42 21,8 35,00

19.1 39,70 I7,o|44,44

106,1 18,02 90,0 17,3= 73,9 18,03 60,0 20,00 49,' ==,9' 40,9 =6,46 34.7.30,41 30,0 34,64

26.3 39,06

23.4 43.59

109,1,22,90

96.6 21,79 83.4 21,79 70,9 22,90 60,o125,00

51.1 27.S4 43.9.31,2=

33.2 35,00

33.7 39.o6 30,o|43 30

111,1 =7.84 100,91=6,46

90.0 25,98

79.1 26,46 6S,9 27,84

60.0 30,00 52,4 3=,79

46.1 36,06 40,9 39,70 36,6 43,59

112,4 32.80 103,9 3',23

94.7 30,42

85.3 30,42 76,1 31,22 67,6 32,79 60,0 35,00

53.4 37,76

47.8 40,94 43,0 44 44

"3,1 106,1

73,9 66,6 60,0 54.2 49,1

37,76 36 06 ^5,00 34,64 j 35.00 36,06 37.76 40,00 4=,72 45,83

114,2 42,72

107.8 40,94

100.9 39.7° 93,7'39,o6 86,3 39 06 79 I 39,70 72.2 40,94 65,8 42,72 60,0 45,00 54,8 47,70

47,70 45,82 44,44 43,59

"4,8

109.1

103.0 96.6 90,0

83,4 43,59

77,0 44,44

70.9 45,82

65.2 47,70

6o,o| 50,00

o

o

o

"A

o 2

H

u

X

< <

INFLUENCE OF SIDE WIND ON VELOCITY AND DIRECTION OF FLIGHT

Angle of wind 90

Velocity ol rlielit

43 50

III.

5

10

15

20

=5

30

35

40

45

50

E

A E-

A 1 E

| A 1 E

A ' E

1 A E

A E

A 1 E

A 1 E

A | E

45,0 7,07 26,6 11,18 18,4 15,81

14,0 20,62 ",3 ,25,48

30,40 35,35 40,36 45,33

63,4 11,18 45,0 ,14,14

33.7 '18,03 26,6 22,36

21.8 26,93

18.4 31,63 16,0 36,39 14,0 41,24

12.5 46,09 ",3 50,97

71,6 115,81 1 76,0 20,62

56.3 18,03 63,4 22,36 45,0 121,21 53,1 125,00 36,9 25,00 j 45,0 28,2s 31,0 29,15 38,7 |32,OI 26,6 33,54 33,7 36,06 23,2 38,08 29,8 40,30

20.6 42,73 26,5 44.7=

18.4 47,44 , 24,0 '49,24

16.7 52,20 ij 21,8 153,86

78.7 25,48 68,2 26,92 59,0 29.1*5 5',3 32,0' 45,o 35,46

39.8 39,06

35.5 ,43,02 32,0 ,47,18, 29,0 51.50'

26.6 155,90 ,

80.5 30,40

71.6 31,62 63.4 33,54 56,3 36,05 50,2 39,05 45,o 42,03

40.6 46,10 36,9 50,00

33.7 54.o8 30,9 58,32

81,8 35,35 74,o 36,40

66.8 38,08 60,2 40,31 54,5 '43,01 49,4 46,10 45,o 49 50 4',2 53,15

37.9 57,02 I 35,0 61,03

82,9 40,34

76.0 141,23 69,4 ,42,72 6.3,5 44.72 ;8,0 47,17

53.1 50,00 48,8 53.15 45,o 56,57

41.6 60,21

38.7 t64,03

83,7 45,30

77.5 U6.09

71.6 47,43 66,0 49.25 60,9 51,49

56.3 54,o8 5=,' 57,o2

48.4 60,21 45,0 63,64 42,0 67,27

84,3 78,7 73,3 68,2 6i,4 59,o 55,o 5'.3 .,6,0 45,0

50,25 50,98 5=,=o 53,85 55,90 58,32

6l,03 6-4.03

70,71

Change or course in degrees. E- Velocity of Flight in Meters per second with respect to the earth. To convert into ft. per sec. multiply all velocities by 3.28

Side wind* affect both velocity and the direction ot' flight. In the present tables A indicates the angle to which the direction of flight is changed for the angle of wind indi-

cated at the top of the table when the aircraft moves at the speed shown in the \ertical column to the left, w hile the speed of wind is thai indicated in the horizontal

>'olnnn ahove the letters A-E. The fivu-e^ under E indicate the velocity of the aircraft with respect to the g-ound under the ahove descrihed conditions.

O

O

o

Mayo Military Reconnaissance Tractor

90 H. P. Gyro-"Duplex' Motor

Gyro-"Duplex" Motor

ADOPTED BY LEADING CONSTRUCTORS

110 H.P. Gyro, 9 cylinders, weight 270 pounds 90 H.P. Gyro, 7 cylinders, weight 215 pounds

GYRO MOTOR COMPANY

N. Y. Office: 331 Madison Avenue

774 Girard Street, Washington, D. C.

inn.......i1!::"

BURGESS- Military Aeroplane DUNNE

furnished to

United States Great Britain Russia

Self-balancing

Self-steering

and

Non-capsizable

Form of wing gives an unprecedented arc of fire and range of observation.

Par excellence the weight and gun-carrying aeroplane of the World.

Tail-less and folding.

Enclosed nacelle with armored cockpit.

Speed range 40-80 miles per hour.

C :mb 400 feet per minute.

Burgess-Dunn* No. 3 Delivered tn U. S. Army at San Diego. December 30

THE BURGESS COMPANY, Marblehead, Mass.

Sole licensees of the American-Dunne Patents


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