Aeronautics

Volume 14 - No. 12 - 1914 June

Table of Contents PDF Document


The American Magazine of Aeronautics was the first commercial magazine in the United States of America about national and international aviation. There were reports on patents and flight contests. The journal was published from July 1907 to July 1915. All pages from the years 1907 to 1915 are available with photos and illustrations as full text, for free.

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IV. No. 12

JUNE 30, 1914

15 Cents

in

Property of |E. W. ROB1SCHON

No king ever enjoyed such sport as this. Four to live hundred miles without pause, at a speed of more than a mile a minute.

Five hundred thousand passenger miles without one serious accident. Used by 'six Governments and by private owners nearly everywhere.^ 'r^ij

URTISS TRAINING SCHOOL

Offers Instruction in the Construction, Care and Operation of Aeroplanes and Flying Boats

^For capable men who are ambitious and seek a permanent foundation »r future work in Aviation, it offers unsurpassed advantages.

[An open field for pleasant, remunerative employment.

[Classes limited to ten students under the personal supervision of Mr. rlenn H. Curtiss.

[^Opportunity to keep directly in touch with latest developments in iviation.

THE SPRING CLASS HAS GRADUATED AND THERE ARE A FEW VACANCIES IN THE MID-SUMMER CLASS

Our Booklet "Training" is Illustrated and gives Full Particulars GET YOUR COPY TO-DAY

rHE CURTISS AEROPLANE CO., Hammondsport, N. Y.

Manufacturers of Aeroplanes, Motors and Equipment for the Leading Governments of the World,

< BEN0I5T «c

AIRCRAFT COMPANY

St. Louis, Missouri or St. Petersburg, Florida

The New lienoist Fli/inu Boat in Action

50 H.P.

160 POUNDS

GYRO MOTOR

80 H.P.

207 POUNDS

Built of Nickel Steel and Vanadium Steel Throughout

Endurance Flying Record

to Date 4hrs., 23min.

Send for Catalog

THE GYRO MOTOR COMPANY, 774 Girard Street, Washington, D. C.

An ordinary propeller wastes gasoline and also puts an extra load on the machine. It burns up power to stir up the air and this turbulent air is a load that must be dragged jn the wake of the machine." PARAGON propellers cut clean. They turn the last unit of power into thrust and speed.

Plain Paragons are unapproacli ed in Design, Materials and Price.

Grade A and Flexing Paragons are beyond all effort of comparison.

Three-bladed Navy PARAGONS for Curtiss Machines and O-X motors are kept in slock.

Ask for free photographs and information

AMERICAN PROPELLER CO., 243-249 East Hamburg Street, Baltimore, Md.

In answering advertisements please mention this magazine.

TENSILE TESTS ON FLEXIBLE STEEL CABLE AND CABLE ENDS.

The following table is the result of a series f tests carried out at East London College University of London) on various methods f mounting flexible steel cables, in cable ends, y James C. Stewart and L. Reeves, and pre-;nted to the Research Committee of the Aero-autical Society of Great Britain.

The specimens were kindlv supplied by [essrs. T. W. K. Clarke & Co.

Cables Xos. I and 3 were fixed in the fol-•wtng manner: The ends were knotted and uned, then inserted in sockets or cable cuds, id solder run in. The ends of cables Nos. 2 id 4 were provided with "Turk's heads," as lown in Fig. 2, and were again fixed by riming in solder.

Fig. 1 shows the method of fixing the cable? uring the tests. The piece marked "A" was ripped in the jaws of the testing machine.

It will be seen from the table that the method f mounting the cable, as employed for speci-tens Nos. 2 and 4, gave very satisfactory re-ilts, the cable in the case of No. 2 apparently nt being weakened by the method of fixing nee it broke outside the sockets.

No. of a

1 6 strands of 19 -01j2

wires round a core of 19 wires

2 6 strands of 19 -0112

wirea round a core of 19 wires

F" 1 ' FOR*

Diam. of Total

FNO TESUJ

Remarks.

Breaking Breaking load. stress, tons, tons per sq. in. •81 01-85 Broke in Bucket just

below the knot.

114

We do not wish to mis-s a single issue.

T. J. W., Mass.

3 6 strands of 19 -0112

wires round a core of 19 wires.

4 12 wires round a -028

core of 7.wires

87-0. Wire went to pieces at thjs luad, two atrands remaining uobroken. One socket. had started to pull out just before breaking. 69-47 Broke in socket just below knot.

106-0 Broke 10 socket wlicrc

AERIAL PROPELLER EXPERIMENTS*

AT THE AEROTECHNIC INSTITUTE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF PARIS .

At Fixed Point:-—The coefficients and b are seen to vary slightly .th speed of rotation, but may be msidered constant for the speed i use. The quality q (of Uenard) epends on the pitch, and the roduct of the quality by the pitch iries only within narrow limits. While Advancing:— Thrust —For propellers studied the thrust

6 v

uio — diminishes when--in-

0« "D

reases. As the number of rota-ons, is, is constant ff0 is constant; nd the abscissas are, therefore, roportional to V, the ordinates to Q. therefore, decreases as V in-

Power:—The curves -, for some

f the propellers, show a continual

ecrease of power ratio as - in-

nD

reases: while for others there is at rst an increase, followed by a de-rease. In every case the decrease >f power ratio is less_ rapid than |hat of the thrust ratio. As the otation is here constant, the «'

urve -■ is also proportional to the

w'o

orque. The torque is. therefore, ar from being proportional to the hrust.

Efficiency: — The efficiency, p. ncreases at first, passes through a 'aximiim more or less extended, id then decreases to zero for V) = O. The maximum efficiency

By M. B. SELLERS

REMARKS ON RESULTS

occurs at a slip of from 25% to 30 7c. The authors explain how these results can be used in determining the properties of a motor propeller group. This I shall give briefly:

Let l\ be a given speed of flight. We calculate for different values V ■

of n, the values of--. We then

nD 10

take on the curve -, the values

of - corresponding to these val-

R'° V

ues of--. As we already have the

nD

values of «■„, at fixed point, for each value of ii we deduce therefrom the values of the power, for the

speed ]\, and the different values of 11. From the values of «' in II.P., we deduce the torque .in metre's TC> K'

kilograms T —--=11.94—: and

2TTa n

we can thus construct a curve representing T in fu'iction of n, for V = V,.

We proceed in the same "ay for the different speeds, f'2. f3, etc., and we g"t the sheet of rnrves re-ntiired. The table herewith shows, for propeller No. 11, the results for speeds 5, 10, 15. 20. 25 metres per sec, and the figure 6 gives the curves.

\Ve can then trace, on this graph. Fig. 6, the curv° characteristic of our motor, and th" points of intersection correspor ';ng to a given speed, F,, will give the rotational

speed ii of propeller, under those conditions. From this we can construct a curve giving n in functions

of r.

Suppose a motor giving constant torque within the! limits of <n considered; the motor curve become:-a line parallel to' the axisyof x*s. Xow, for illustration, findr on the diagram, Fig. 6, the points where the torque 40, 35, etc., cut the curves; and from this draw the curves. Fig. 7, giving the relations between V and n.

Thus, for T — 30. we have 17.2 turns per second at fixed point; 16.7 turns for {' = 5, and 17.0 for V — 10, etc. From this we can

r

calculate the values of -, and

ii D

0

then, by means of lhe curve — ,

the thrust.

It is seen that, for some pro-jxdlers, n increases throughout as V increases, whereas for others n at first decreases.

As before stated, no definite conclusion can be drawn as to the best profile of those tried, and it is hoped that some systematic tests will be made, with that object in view.

If the reader will refer to AERONAUTICS for January, 1911, he will find an article in which I have plotted a curve giving the relation of thrust-ratio to slip, for the propellers tested by M. Kaihouchinsky. The curve is similar to some of those here givtil.

* Continued fro-u the June 15th

issue.

     
         

\

 

21S

SIS

.__4tl___

 

x n.i.-*n

         
         

J

L--47—,

Table of Results at Fixed Point

N

n

cn kg*,

CT0

CD chevaux

en Kgma par seconrte

_ e0

* n-'Di

 

An

a

F

480

8

37,2

4,4

330

0,0153

0,00681

8,45

2,25

540

9

46

6,05

454

150

660

7,60

2,27

600

10

56,4

8,3

623

149

660

6,79

2,26

660

11

68,5

10,9

817

150

650

6,28

2,30

720

12

82,6

13,5

1.011

152

621

6,10

2,44

780

13

100

17,2

1.290

156

624

5,81

2,50

840

14

119,2

22

1.650

161

638

5,41

2,52

900

15

139

27,4

2.050

163

644

5,09

2,52

960

16

160

34

2.550

165

601

4,80

2,50

1 020

17

180,3

41,2

3.090

165

664

4,38

2,49

1.080

18

202,5

49,0

3.725

165

670

4,08

2,44 1

1 140

19

226.5

59,2

4.450

166

688

3.82

2,41

1 200

20

254

70

5.230

168

695

3,63

2,41

     

a' 4

0.01653 4

     
   

9 ■

(^.0,08 o,00682 0,08 1>55-

   

PITCH poifTHE. S~ sa^-rro/VS

: lm,?30 -

- l-^oo —

li»,410 - 1°

',425 — 1

■»,3S0.

Fip-. S

Page 181

0,336

0,940

12,7 12,6

!

0,745

10,05 10

§

in

3

0,795

13.7 12,6

5

Hi

1

0,837

18,4

15,7

5

lu

s

!• si

I

S IS

0,378

!

s as

V J

II

0,918

37,8 26,5

S

 

* s

0,937

46,5 30,8

0,212

!• 38

.5

5 33

I

1.032

73,7 4i

COE'O

0,972

68,1 40,6

 

• • -A

: • e

 

i \i

 

i is

i

 
     

§

111

 

I

0,642

14,2 12,1

 

S

§ 83

 

!

J 83

 
 

0,782

32,2 22,6

s«" 1 S »£-

> I

o

I 38

V: 0,560

0,670

33,2 22

0,425

 

i S*3

0,405

I it

 
 

! U

i ■ i»

   

Fig. 6

 

\ \

               
 

v

w

             

V

A

\V

             
 

\\

\\

\

           
 

V

A

\

           
 

A

\

             
 

\\

 

\\

           
 

\\

 

\\

           
     

\

\\

           
                     
                     
                     
 

/

/

/ /

           

e a = - J

< I 1 i i 5. J Fig. 7

100-H.P. MODEL E—FOUR STURTEVANT MOTOR.

As announced last issue, the Stur-tevant Company is confining itself to the 100 li.p. model. This new model is of the 4-cylinder, 4-cycIe, water-cooled, vertical type; bore 4J/2 in., stroke 6 in., normal speed 1,800 r.p.m. The propeller shaft is driven through a reducing gear and turns 900 r.p.m.. The cylinders are of the T-head design, cast en bloc of semi-steel; water jackets cast integral with cylinders; two inlet and two exhaust valves provided in each cylinder. These are of large diameter and made of Rich's tungsten steel. They are mechanically ope-

Propeller shaft is carried on two large annular ball bearings and driven from the crank shaft by hardened chrome nickel-steel spur gears. These gears, as well as the half-time gears operating the cam shafts, are contained within an oil-tight casting integral with the base, and operated in a bath of oil. A large two-way, ball-thrust bearing is provided on the propeller shaft to take the thrust of a propeller or tractor screw, as the case may be.

Lubrication is of the complete forced system, a pressure of 50 lbs. being maintained on all bearings by

SHARP-DE VILLERS SUIT.

The case of Reese Sharp, of Or Nehr., against the Aeroplanes, M tors & Equipment Co., of 171 Broadway, New York, came on tl calendar for trial in the Municip Court, West 54th Street, on Jul 19th. A representative of the £ torncy _ for the Aeroplanes, Moto & Equipment Co. appeared and c fered an excuse for adjournmeri The court refused to grant an a journment. Testimony was take and judgment was rendered in f vor of the plaintiff for $256.25 ai costs.

laled by means of separate cams and push-rods direct from two cam shafts, and are easily removed for inspection or grinding without disturbing any other parts of the engine.

Pistons are of the same material as cylinders, extremely light, well ribbed for strength, and provided with three compression rings. Piston pin is chrome nickel steel, bored hollow, hardened and ground.

Connecting rods, "II" section, machined all over from forgings of the famous B. N. D. steel, and after being heat-treated have a tensile strength of 285,000 lbs. per sq. in. The big ends are fitted with interchangeable bushings of Parson's white brass, and the small ends are bushed with Phosphor bronze.

Crank shaft is chrome_ nickle steel, large diameter, machined all over, bored hollow throughout, supported on five bearings interchangeably bushed with Parson's white brass.

The base consists of two castings of a special aluminum alloy. The upper half of the base is designed with a view of strength and rigidity rather than extreme lightness. This contains the main bearings, and the -Manganese bronze bearing caps are held in place by through bolts, which are also used to hold down the cylinders. The lower half of the base is of very light construction, and is designed for the purpose of containing the lubricating oil.

The two cam shafts are contained within the upper half of the base; large bronze bearings; steel gears; cams are integral with shaft.

rotary pump, submerged m the oil. All oil passages are" cast_ integral with the base, no piping being used. The entire surface of the lower half of the base is covered with a fine mesh screen, through which the oil passes before reaching the pump. A tubular oil cooler, through which all the air entering the carburetor must pass, is submerged in the oil. Oil capacity, 5 hours.

Carburetor is Zenith type, bolted rigidly,to the lower half of the base, and receives warm air from the oil cooler.- Either a fuel pump or air •pump can be supplied with the motor for the purpose of supplying fuel to the carburetor, if it is desired to place .the tank below the level of the float chamber. • Bosch ignition, 2-spark, dual, with 2-spark plug's. Batteries may be used to_ facilitate starting.

Centrifugal pump delivers a large quantity of water into the water jacket on the exhaust valve side.

Every motor is first coupled to a dynamometer and required to show its rated horsepower, and later is subjected to a rigid test with a propeller, under the same conditions which it would operate in actual service.

The weight of this motor complete, with flywheel, carburetor, magneto, spark plugs, etc., but without radiator and propeller, is 420 pounds.

Several of these motors have already been sold, and among the parties who now have them in use are the Burgess Co. of Marblehead, Mass., and the Bay Cities Flying Boat Co., who have one in the aeroplane ferry operating between Oakland and San Francisco.

INVESTIGATION OF AC CIDENTS.

Long urged by AERONAUTIC! the Aero Club of America has no taken up the investigation of f lalities and has issued the first tw reports of its "Public Safety an Accidents Investigation Committee, treating of the fatal accidents 1 II. P. Riche (II. I'. Harris), | Akron, on May i, and to Percy Va Ness, at Utica, May 8.

The- conclusions are that Kiel strained the machine in his dowi ward dive and sharp upturn; th; he failed to exercise proper care i making, repairs made necessary 1 previous accident; that fasteninj of struts and wing beams were ii secure.

In the Van Ness accident, tl aviator had slight experience an took' too ambitious a flight with previously untried machine; the fiel was too limited and a turn w; necessary by topographical cond tions, in which the machine sidj slipped, and dove, landing in tl direction from which it came. Tli machine was noticed to be tai heavy.

This is good work and is to 1 highly commended.

IMPORTS AND EXPORT FOR APRIL.

Imports, Foreign — Parts onl> $119; for 10 months ending Apri parts only, $26,359.

Exports, Domestic — Two aerc planes, $6,500; parts, $6,646. Fo 10 months ending April—Aeroplane to total of $157,424; parts, $36,577

Exports, Foreign—None. For I months ending April, one plane am parts, $4,949.

No goods remaining in ware house.

NEW INCORPORATIONS

Great Falls Aviation Co., Grea Falls, Mont.; formed by C. B. am .]. II. I'rodger.

Terrell Aeroplane & Exhibitioi Co., Inc.. Utica. N. Y.; $5,000; T 11. Murphy, F. E. Hanabray, C. A Terrell.

Pendhayn Aviation Co., Chicago $5,000; Emil I\ahn, Joseph Pend hayn and Mamie Kahn.

Ravgorodsky Aeroplane Co., 131 \Y. 36th St., New York; $125,000: M. I. Berg. B. B. Valentine, J. E. Haskell, A. Raygorodsky.

Sc'ieusselburg's Aeroplane Corporation, Dover, Del.; $50,000.

NILES LOOPS OVER NEW YORK.

On June 24 Charles S. Niles, who .vas second in the Aeronautical So-■iety of America's race around Manhattan last Fall for the Times irizes, and who has been looping he loop and flying upside down in he Moisant monoplane, flew from he aviation field at Hempstead to Governors Island, over which he en-ertained army officers and aviation fans by making the most sensational lights yet made in his career, eyewitnesses declaring he outdid Lin-:oln Beachey in his loops, tail slides, turning over and upside down _ flying. Part of the time his evolutions were over the skyscrapers over lower Manhattan, where thousands watched in trepidation. To describe lis feats would be like painting the rose. Readers can imagine the spectacle.

TRANSATLANTIC AEROPLANE FLYING.

The Wanamaker transatlantic flyer has been launched and is now being flown in trial flights at Ilam-iiondsport over Lake Keuka by Lieut. Forte, who will be the pilot in the attempt to cross the Atlantic wme time in July if preparations ;an be made in time. The flight is

plugs, plug-hoods and cable. The pilot and mechanics are entirely protected from weather by the hood. The planking is diagonal at the bow, but wraps around a tubular fuselage. The approximate size of the boat may be seen from the second picture of the christening.

The fuel supply is arranged to be carried in six tanks, all located in the middle of the hull, directly under the centre of pressure. In one compartment, separated from the cabin occupied by the pilots, are three tanks, the largest of 150 gallons capacity, and beside it two tanks of fifty gallons each. In the corner of the cabin are two tanks of approximately twenty-five gallons capacity each.

All of these tanks will drain simultaneously into a smaller supply tank, from which the gasolene will be pumped to the motors. Emptied in this way the lessening of the load will not materially affect the machine's balance in the air. The tanks are fitted with splash boards and set on parts to prevent vibration affecting the connections.

Of the dual controls one side will have the standard Curtiss shoulder yoke, to which George Hallett is accustomed, while Lieut. John C. Porte will use the Deperdussin foot bar, witli which he is familiar.

layer of glue may also be brushed on over the canvas. This same glue is also made expressly for the purpose of use in combination with calico between the double planking of diagonally-built hulls. Full instructions may be had from the L. W. Ferdinand Co., 201 South St., Boston.

anticipated to lie made via the Azores, from Newfoundland, and a supply station has already been established by Lansing Callan at I'onta Delgada.

Various tests are being made at Hammondsport. The engines have been switched so that the two propellers rotate in opposite directions from the first direction. Weights are being carried to_ test the capacity. The pictures give a good idea of the craft.

The two 200-11. P. engines have been thoroughly tested on the block, as reported in the last issue of A E R O N AUT1 C S. These are equipped with I'osch magnetos.

GLUE FOR WATERPROOFING.

In the description of the l'.oland flying boat, last issue, Jeffery's marine glue was mentioned. This is a glue especially designed for waterproofing airtight compartments, canvas over wooden hulls or pontoons, and for attaching canvas or other materials to wood, zinc and so forth. After being melted over a moderate fire, this glue is spread on the surface of the wood with a stiff brush. The canvas is then laid and gone over with an ordinary hot flat-iron; or, the canvas may he painted first and then laid on the wood. A thin

BALLOON RACERS MEET AWFUL

EXPERIENCES.

Anxiety is felt for the safety of Roy Donaldson, of Springfield. 111., and Wilbur Henderson, his aid, in the balloon "Springfield," one of the four contestants in the balloon race starting from Portland, Ore., Tune 11th.

The "Kansas City 111," with John Watts, pilot, ascended from the circus grounds at 4:09 p. m. Thursday, June 11th. The others started at 10-minute intervals in the following order: "Uncle Sam," Capt. Honeywell, pilot; "Springfield," Roy Donaldson, pilot, and the "Million Population Club," piloted by John Berry of St. Louis.

Soon after dark the balloons encountered a terrific wind, thunder and lightning storm. The "Uncle Sam" was forced to land a few hours after the start near Beaver Creek, about 18 miles from Portland. Friday afternoon one of the carrier pigeons, carried by three of the balloonists, brought word that Berry's balloon had been struck by Pghtning and that Berry had been injured. The message did not give the location. The "Million Population Club" was found later, however, near Clarkes, 27 miles from Portland. Berry was not injured seriously.

The "Kansas City III," with John Watts and Roscoe Fawcett, aid, landed safely in Marion County, nine miles from Cascadia, at 9:20 Friday morning, having covered the greatest distance, some 75-80 miles, with the balloon "Springfield" still to be heard from.

The missing balloon was sighted over the Sandy River district early Friday morning. It took Watts and his companion 24 hours to get out of the wilderness and to a ranch. A bi-weekly stage is the only means of communication between the ranch and civilization. The Watts balloon was almost destroyed in landing in the trees.

Berry reports his balloon exploded by lightning, and it parachuted into the treetops, after coming, snow-covered, from an altitude of 12,000 feet.

ELEVEN ENTER

BALLOON RACE.

St. Louis, June 4.— Eleven entries for the elimination balloon race here I on July 11 were announced to-day by the St. Louis Aero Club. The list, the largest ever recorded for I the national race, follows:

Roy S. Donaldson, Springfield, 111.; Jerome Kingsburv, New York \ Citv; R. A. D. Preston, Akron. O.; Arthur Athcrholt, Philadelphia: 11. E. Honeywell. E. S. Coles. Willia™ -v Assinann. Paul J. McCuIlough and Cant. Iohn Berry. St. Louis: Warren Rasor. Brookvillc, ().; John Watts, Kansas Citv. Mo.

BALLOON ASCENSIONS.

\kron, O., May 18—R. A. D. Preston, R. II. Upson and Passenger, in the "Goodyear," to Navarre: duration. 5 hours; altitude, 8,700 ft.

AT JOHNSON'S SCHOOL.

The Walter E. Johnson School of Aviation opened Decoration Day with a number of good nights by W. E. Johnson and W. H. Mirmer-ly. A few passengers were carried, and the new students were given their first rides.

Among the most promising of the students is Arthur Redpath, formerly mechanician for Chas. Herrmann and Walter Johnson, who, from his long familiarity wi'th aeroplanes, only needed the experience in the air.

Two young ladies are expected to join the class the early part of next week, to learn to handle their own flying boats this season.

Matt Tooey, the well - known Conesus Lake sportsman, is progressing rapidly in the art of passenger carrying, having done quite a large ferry business last Sunday from McPhersons Point to Long Point and return.

The machines are housed within a hundred feet of the Livingston Inn, a well-known summer resort, where first-class accommodations can be had by aviation students at special rates.

Two large hangars will be built in a short time, as construction is well under way at the present writing.

Walter Johnson has been flying the past two weeks at Greenwich, Conn., with his flying boat.

Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, and will be conducted by Assistant Naval Constructor Jerome C. Hunsaker, U. S. N., who is detailed for the service by the Secretary of the Navy. Courses in dynamics of rigid bodies and theoretical fluid dynamics will be giveri by Prof. E. P. Wilson, Ph.D., professor of mathematics; in explosion motors, by Joseph C. Riley, S.B., associate professor of heat engineering; while special lecturers will deliver courses in wireless telegraphy and meteorology. Donald W. Douglas, S.B., is assistant in the laboratory.

MASS. TECH. ANNOUNCES COURSE IN AERODYNAMICS.

Outlines of the course _ in aeronautical engineering have just been issued by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the first of the kind in the country. The Institute offers a graduate course leading to the degree of Master of Science, which is open to graduates of the Institute in mechanical engineering, electrical engineering and naval architecture, and to graduates of other colleges whose preparation is equivalent to the work required for the bachelor's degree in one of these courses.

The course is intended to furnish training in the design and construction of air-craft, dirigibles, aeroplanes and hydro-aeroplanes. Attempt will be made to train men who are already engineers to undertake the experimental development of air craft, their manufacture, repair and maintenance.

The students will be required to design and prepare working drawings, and to aid them a complete information file has been collected and plans and descriptive material are available for the principal European and American air craft. A special aeronautical library of 400 volumes, together with the leading periodicals, will be for the use of the students.

The experimental laws of aerodynamics will be studied in the new laboratory in such manner as to develop in the student an appreciation of their importance in design of air craft, and the ability to make use of the published results of experiments conducted in other laboratories. The aerodynamical laboratory, on the new site, has already been described (AERONAUTICS, March 31).

The courses will be under the general direction of Prof. Cecil II. Peabody, head of the department of

WINDEL AUTOMATIC STABILIZER.

Theodore Windel has patented, through F. W. Barker, the patent attorney, an automatic system for longitudinal as well as lateral stability.

"Using the device as an elevator, two planes are arranged at rear of fuselage to rotate free around their own central axes, each of which is in an inclined position and both at equal opposite angles, connected at front by a spring regulated to a certain tension equal to_ a certain pressure on a small vertical lateral surface, one on each of said planes. In starting an aeroplane from the ground, the pressure on vertical (lateral) planes ("gf") _ will slowly equalize the pull of spring at front side of plates ("de"), causing them to rotate around their axes, at same time lowering the tail of aeroplane and diminishing the angle of incidence. At more speed these planes will be caused to rotate still more, according to the tension at which

("ij"), with fins or vanes ("lk") attached vertically _ to rear of each plane, are fixed rigid, each on an axis running through center of same at equal opposite angles, one of said planes attached on each extreme side of aeroplane, and each of said planes to rotate free in its whole around its own axis, according to pressure exerted on vertical fins ("lk").

"If aeroplane is out of balance, it will skid a certain amount, according to actual speed, lateral1 angle or rudder operation, towards its lower side, but as planes are free to swing and the skidding action produces a certain pressure on fins, it compels same to rotate and by so doing changes their respective angles of incidence, bringing lower side back to normal level or by rudder operation banking machine."

AEROPLANE ORDERS BY RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT.

The War Department has completed its program for aerial craft, covering this year. According to the Russian press it is proposed to order 326 ordinary aeroplanes and 10 aeroplanes of the type of the Sikorsky "Ilva Murometz." Of the 326, 100 will be of the type of Sikorsky, of moderate dimensions. The others will represent the types of Farman, Duperdussin, Morane, and Voisin. The proposed! program will be completed before the autumn of 1914. The War Department has already ordered three large dirigibles, of which two will be constructed in France and the third in Russia.

spring is set to equalize with the pressure exerted on vanes ("gf"). Should the speed of aeroplane decrease, the pressure on vanes correspondingly diminishes, the tension of spring rotates planes ("de") till they again equalize with the pull of springs against pressure of vertical vanes ("gf"), according to predetermined speed of machine in a horizontal position. If the engine should accidentally stop, this device would, it is claimed, raise the tail and bring the wdiole aeroplane to its gliding angle, keeping machine at its predetermined speed at all times. If the speed, through gusts or other causes, should increase, reverse action will take place, compelling the whole machine to level up or even raise, till its momentum or speed diminishes.

"For lateral automatic balance, two independent auxiliary planes

IN AIR 18 HOURS.

Berlin, June 24.—Gustav Passer, a German aviator, made a new world's record for duration of an aeroplane flight without passengers at Johannisthal to-day by remaining in the air 18 hours and 10 minutes. The previous mark was 14 hours and 7 minutes, set by Bruno Langer, also a German, on February 3 last.

MAKES NEW ALTITUDE RECORD.

Independence, Cal., June 25.— Silas Christofferson, aviator, in a biplane flew to-day over the peak of Mount Whitney, 14,898 feet high. He attained an altitude estimated at more than 16,000 feet and established, it is contended, a new American altitude record.

MODEL NOTES

HARRY SCHULTZ, Mode! Editor

THE HERZOG-PARKER MONOPLANE

The Monoplane shown in the accompanying drawing was designed »nd built by Harry Herzog and Cortland S. Parker of Brooklyn, N. Y. Both of these young men have Experimented with models and gliders for some years and have at last turned their attention to full-sized ■nachines.

tending along the sides of the body, and secured thereto by steel plates, are spruce outriggers which support the elevator.

The main planes have a dihedral angle of 17 inches and are supported above by stranded steel cables running to two uprights, secured to the fuselage at the entering edge of

sprung wheels at the rear, together with a rearwardly extending skid to protect the propeller.

A Detroit Aero_ Motor has been used on this machine, but owing to its age and for other reasons has not been giving its usual amount of power, which has been a great handicap to the testing out of the machine. However, the builders expect to install a new motor shortlv.

This diminutive machine is of tigh-class construction and finish, nd according to the statements of he designers, ought to prove an ex-ellent flyer. The span of the main Janes is only 20 feet, the overall length approximately 14 feet, and ihe complete weight, with pilot and lull tanks, approximately 400 I'Otinds.

The body of the machine is of treamline form, built up and cov-red with fabric, and. as shown by he detail sketch, has a very neatly pholstered cockpit and seat. Ex-

the main plane, and below by cables running to beams forming part of the chassis. At the outer ends of the main plane are rudders two feet square, which act on the principle of the Boland device, steering and balancing the machine. These rudders arc operated by the turning of a hand wheel and the elevator is controlled also by pulling backward and pushing forward on the hand wheel.

The chassis consists of an elasti-cally sprung skid at the front of the fuselage and two elastically

THE FENOUILLET GLIDER.

The subject of the scale drawing shown is the Fenouillet biplane glider, constructed and flown by Louis A. Fenouillet, Jr., of Brooklyn, member of the Aeronautical Society of America and the Aero Science Club.

The glider, which was one of the aeronautical exhibits at the Spring Festival and Ball held at the Seventy-first Regiment Armory in April, has proven to be a very steady flyer, as scores of hand-towed flights have been made at Governor's Island and other places, ranging in distances of 100 to 3,000 feet at altitudes of 20 to 100 feet.

The design of the glider is somewhat on the standard biplane type, hut some novel features are employed in the construction, namely, the beams of the main planes, tail planes, rudder outriggers, vertical rudder uprights and_ arm pieces are of ash, as most strain is upon these members, while the laminated ribs, streamline uprights, and struts, are of spruce, and clamps, hinges, and rudder sockets being sheet iron, while the upright sockets are of aluminum, and eyebolts for clamping the upright sockets and all other stove bolts employed are 3/16-inch round.

The ribs of the main planes are of two laminations, with a 2^-inch camber, one-third back from the entering edge, and are bound to the main beams with a strong linen thread, and then glued with Ambroid, while the main plane uprights are stream-line, tapering from ?s inch round at the ends to l'/> inch in the centre.

Another feature of the construction are the hinged tail planes (the ribs of which are straight) to make assembling and dismantling quicker.

The covering, which is laced to the planes, is a cheap unbleached muslin treated with a "dope," consisting of a coat of thin, hot glue, applied on each side and then shellacked.

The principal dimensions of the glider are: Span, 20 ft.; chord. 4 ft.: length. 9 ft.: span of tail. 5 ft.: width, 3 ft. 4 in.; rudder, 2 ft. 7 in. by 3 fct. 10 in.; gap between planes. 4 ft., and the weight 55 lbs.

Frenchman Finds Safety in Aviation.

Another parachute pack. Somehow or other nothing is done in aviation save in France.

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Aero Science Club of

America Bulletin.

A model propeller testing machine has been donated by the Aeronautical Bureau for making relative thrust tests of model propellers and to 4 p. m.

tractors. A vote of thanks has been extended to the Aeronautical I'.u-reau for this donation.

At the meeting of June 13 Messrs. L. & IT. Blomquist visited the club and gave a very excellent demonstration of their "Synchronous oscillators." which were tested in many ways, and clearly demonstrated their practicability. Mr. George Bauer, one of the members of the club, will co-operate with Messrs. lilomquist in constructing a model having oscillators as a substitute for planes and propellers. It has been decided to hold

contest for flying boats at Prospect Park Lake, Brooklyn, on July 12, 1

29 West 39th Street, New York

OFFICIAL BULLETIN. New Members.

- Elias E. Ries, 116 Nassau St New York.

Gail Ison, 510 Mill St., Raymond Wash.

Directors Meetings—

Directors' meetings are being heli every Thursday evening throughoil the summer, as usual. RegulJ weekly members' meetings are helf as usual. The monthly lectures ha^ been suspended for the summer se\ son.

Data Sheets.

The second series of data shee-has been sent out to members, co 1 sisting of nearly a hundred sheets. I

Annual Derby—■

Plans are in progress for the pe i petuation of the race around Nel York as inaugurated last Fall, mal ing it an annual event on a pJ with the great classics of the spot" ing world.

Meetings are held every Saturd; i evening at the Aeronautical Societj j 9 West Thirty-ninth street, Nel York City. This club controls til model flying in this country thronpl its branches, and all records of of" cial flights must be certified by it.

E. II. Jaquith is operating a Cu tiss flying boat at Atlantic City, d ing a good business in carrying pa sengers at $15 a flight.

Tony Jannus is creating splend interest and doing good work in ca J rying passengers at Sandusky, wheil he has established himself, as ai| nounced last issue. Jannus devot< himself exclusively to water flyinl and is open for engagements an' where for passenger or exhibitio work.

Boland Flying Boaj

ONLY TWO CONTROLS SIMPLEST TO OPERATE

BOLAND MOTORS-60,70,100-125 H.P.

Repair and Construction Work in Hest Equipped Factory

AEROMARINE PLANE & MOTOR CO.

Exclusive manufacturers under Boland Patents AVONDALE, N. J.

In answering advertisements please mention this magazine.

W-RON.-IUTICS. June 30, 1914.

/>/<- 187

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INDEX TO VOLUME XIV.

N0TE.—Volume I started with the first issue, that of July, 1907; Volume II started with the issue of January, 1908; Volume 111, with the July, 1908, issue; Volume IV, with the January, 1909, number; Volume V, with the July, 1909, number; Volume VI, with the January, 1910, issue; Volume VII, with the July, 1910, issue; Volume VIII, with the January, 1911, number; Volume IX, with the July, 1911, issue; Volume A, with lanuary, 1912; \ olume XI, with July, 1912; Volume XII, with January, 1913; Volume XIII, with July, 1913, and Volume XIV, with January 15, 1914.

Only principal articles are indexed. Xews notes in general and smaller mentions are not indexed. I'ages 1- 16—No. 1, January 15, 1914. 17- 32 -No. 2, lanuary 31, 1914. " 33- 48—No. 3. February 14, 1914. •• 49. 64—No. 4, February 28, 1914. " 65- 80—No. 5, March 15, 1914. " 81- 96—No. 6, March 31, 1914. " 97-112—No. 7, April 15, 1914. " 113-128—No. 8, April 30, 1914. " 129-144—No. 9, May 15, 1914. " 145-160—No. 10, May 30, 1914. " 161-176—No. 11, June 15, 1914. " 177-192—No. 12, June 30, 1914. Accidents, Fatal: rage

Bell..................................... 58

Ellington-Kelly ........................... 8

Ilamel Lost at Sea........................ 156

Harris (Riche) ........................... 138

Investigations of ......................... 182

Murray, Lieutenant J. McC................58-71

Fost ....................................44-74

Royston ................................. 138

Van Ness ................................ 138

Aerial Marksmanship ......................... 119

Aerodynamical Laboratory, Langley........... . 28

Aerodynamical Laboratory, New M. I. T. Built. . 88

Aerodynamics, M. I. T., New Course in......8, 184

Aeronautic Service, U. S. Navy.............. 19

Aeronautical Society, Bulletins................

62, 76, 92, 110, 124, 142, 156, 174, 186 Data Sheets:

For Calculating Length of Chain........ 104

Guy Wire and Cable Data............... 126

Horsepower Formulae .................. 104

Horsepower at a Glance—A. L. A. M.

Formula ............................ 154

Horsepower Table by A. L. A. M. Formula 104 Influence of Side Wind and Direction of

Flight .............................. 154

Table of Decimal Equivalents........... 126

Aeronautics, in Congress......12,71,73,120,105,156

U. S. Army.................88,105,120,136,172

U. S. Navy...............................10,19

Aeroplane, Army Tests for.................... 117

Blanchard Monoplane..................... 119

Burgess-Dunne Hydroplane, with drawings.. 83

Burgess-Dunne Hydroaeroplane ..........108, 137

Curtiss Tractor (non-infringing)............ 153

Efficiency, by M. B. Sellers............89,99,116

Grant, Aerostable, Features of.............. 72

llayot................................... 118

Langley, Flights .........................148-168

Description, Trials ..................... 148

Records (see under Records).

Russia Orders ............................ 184

Schmitt, Paul, Variable Angle Biplane....... 101

Sellers, with Negative Wing Tips.......... 70

Sikorsky Aerobus ......................... 103

Sopwith "Tabloid," with Speed Range...... 133

Air Life Preservers.......................... 102

Airboat Line, Benoist, St. Petersburg-Tampa..

12, 20, 46, 58, 78, 121

Air Touring Maps ........................... 88

Army, Aeronautics .......................... 120

Aeroplanes for Venezuela.................. 25

Bomb-Dropping Tests ....................60, 136

Flying Records .................88.105,136,172

Fliers, Three New Records Made........... 74

Wright Situation and the................... 74

Aviation and Insurance....................... 89

French National Fund..................... 46

In France ............................... 147

In Mexico .................60, 120, 136, 138, 152

In the Navy Abroad....................... 131

Reserve, U. S............................ 104

Avro Safety Belt ............................ 87

l'.alloon, Ascensions, 1913...................25, 183

Germany, Five New Zeppelins for.......... 10

Goodyear Crosses Lake Erie............... 134

In Germany .............................. 68

Oxygen Apparatus ........................ 5

Race ..................................134,

National ............................8b> 11

International .........................

Kansas City ............................

Record of Zeppelin L-3.................... 1-\

Wananiaker Gift .........................

Bell, Frank M., Death of............•........

Brock Wins English Air Derby............... 1;

Christofferson's Long Flight...................5S> ]

Companies, Burgess Co. & Curtis Dissolve.....

Burgess Company Formed .................

Connecticut Aeroplane Co..................

Curtiss School Opened..................... B

Jannus in Business......................•• J;

Johnson, W. E., School.................172, 1!

New Incorporations .....................•■

S, 58, 73, 92, 106, 121, 133, 151, 1!

New. Sloane Company...................... 1(,

Wright—Change of Ownership............. |4

School, Spring Activities ............... !•

Control, Blondin.............................

Kamp's Automatic ........................ «

Lateral, On ...............................

Wright Wheel ............................ <

Curtiss Boats for Europe....................... (

200 H.P. Motor ..........................

Invents Air Skiing....................... U

Dirigibles, Germany Buys Five Zeppelins........

Record of Zeppelin L-3...................• J]

De Villers Sued...........................138, 11

Fabric, Aeroplane ........................... 1

Floats, Hydroaeroplane, Notes on.............. <

Flying Boat, Benoist ......................... I

Boland, with drawings..................... j

Boland .................................. 1]

Curtiss, with drawings..................... '

Italian Navy .......................... j

Monoplane, with drawings.............. <

U. S. Navy ...........................

U. S. Navy, O.W.L. 11................

Hamilton................................

Hull, Hydromechanic Experiments with..... 1.

Self-Starters for .......................... H

Sloane School ..........................30, 1(

with drawings ......................... -

St. Petersburg-Tampa Ferry.. 12, 20, 58, 46, 78, lj

Thomas ................................. !•

with drawings .........................

Under Federal Rules.......................60,/

Wright, Type "G," with drawings.......... 1/

Gilpatric Flies Over New York................. 1(

Lands on Wires........................... 14

Glue for Waterproofing ...................... it

Goodyear Aero Club Formed.................. H

Gyropter of Papin and Rouilly................ It

Hamilton, Charles K., Death of............... 2

Handicapping Aeroplanes .....................

Hulls, Hydroplane........................... IS

Hydromechanic Experiments with Flying-boat Hulls l3 Imports and Exports. ... 10, 44, 72, 105, 121, 158, li-

Insurance and Aviation....................... 8

International Aeronautical Congress............ 12

Interstate Airboating Botherless (Editorial).... 7

by Beachey ...................10, 12, 134, 15

Niles over N. Y........................ 18

Langley Aerodynamical Laboratory. ............ 2

Aeroplane, History and Description........

Samuel Pierpont .......................... 15

Looping Machine, Latest...................... 11

Flights ............................44.120,12

Mackay Trophy Won at Record Speed........ 1

Means' Smoke Signal ....................... 11

Measuring Speed ............................ 10

Merrill Reply to Sperry Criticism............. 9

Models, by Harry Schultz.26, 28, 54, 91, 122, 158, 18

Motor, Air Starter for........................ 13

Ashmusen Opposed ....................... u'

Austro-Daimler .......................... 5.

Curtiss, 200 II.P.......................... 4, 7

De Dion Bouton.......................... 5.

Gyro ..................................108, 16!

Hall-Scott Test ........................... '

Kemp, Special Outfit....................... IP

Le Rhone ................................ 15!

I'anhard-Levassor ........................ 5;

Reciprocating (Gyro) ..................... 6, 7'

Renault ................................. 3(

Selecting, Mounting and Maintaining a Power

Plant, by H. \V. Ashmusen.............. 11J

Sturtevant, 100 H.P....................... 17'

100 H.P. Model E...................... 18:

Trans-Atlantic, Curtiss Test ................ 16£

'ublished semi-monthly in the best interests of Aero-tutics

1Y

AERONAUTICS PRESS INC. 250 West 54th Street New York Telephone, Columbus 8721 Cable, Aeronautics, New York

IRNEST L. JONES Editor

I P. SELLERS, Technical Editor

■lRRY SCHULTZ, Model Editor

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WALTER E. JOHNSON SCHOOL of AVIATION

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Navy, Aeronautics in the..................... 10

Aviation Abroad ......................... 131

Aeronautic Service ....................... 19

Receives More Flying Boats................ 14

Patents, U. S. Army and the Wright Situation.. 74

Wright-Curtiss (Patent Upheld)........... 21

Wright Situation ......................57, 71, 89

Perrin Life Preserver......................... 7

Petition of Capt. W. I. Chambers (Editorial).. 100 Phosphorescent Aircraft and Landing Stages,

by William J. Hammer..................... 94

Propeller Experiments, by M. B. Sellers.35,. 163, 179

Race, Aeroplane, International, 1914, Provisions 10

Balloon ................................134, 183

National .............................88, 105

International ......................... 44

Kansas City ........................... 20

M. V. P. B. A. to Have Flying Boat....... 88

Christofferson Wins 324-Mile .............. 140

World ...........................44, 62, 71, 172

Records, Altitude. Post....................... 44

Altitude, Christofferson ................ 183

Martin ............................... 106

American Non-Stop ....................... 25

Army Flying...................88,136,105,172

Cross Country by Army Aviator........... 58

McCauley Altitude ....................... 78

of the Zeppelin L-3........................ 153

Taliaferro Trip ........................... 44

Three New Records by Army Flyers........ 74

World's ................................. 89

Altitude............................. 10

Cross-Country Endurance ............... 44

Zeppelin Balloon .......................... 153

St. George's Aeronautical Society.............. 156

Self-Starters for Flying Boats................. 101

Sellers, M. B. (See "Technical Talks).

'•Sky Travel Made Safe""..................... 5

S"loane 220 H.P. Aero-Skimmer, with drawings.. 55

Smoke Signal, Means ........................ 1'

Stability, Automatic on Curtiss 'Planes........ 1

Device, Ashmusen Lateral.................. H

Kamp's Automatic ......................... 8

Sperry Gyroscope Stabilizer................37. 8

Windel Automatic ......................... '8

Wright Automatic Stabilizer...............

Stabilizers, The Fallacy of Pendulum.......... 8

Steering of Aeroplanes by Ailerons Alone..... M

Tachometer, Morell .......................... 9

Technical Talks, by M. P. Sellers.

The Flying Motorcycle.....................

Aerial Propeller Experiments............... 17

Aeroplane Efficiency ..................85,99,11

Comparison of Lift Ratio and Lift of Aero

foils................................... 5

Lift and Drift of a Full-Sized Aeroplane Wing

Compared with That of a Model.......... 13

Propeller Experiments ...................35, 16

The Slip Stream and the Angle of Attack... 14 Tensile Tests on Flexible Steel Cable and Cable

Ends ...................................... 17

Tests, Army Bomb-Dropping.................60, 13

Army Aeroplanes ......................... 11

Motor ...................................8,16

on Eye-Polts ............................. 16

Trans-Atlantic Flight .....................60,73,9

Twin Motors for ......................... 6

Wanamaker-Curtiss .........44, 60, 105, 168, ll

Vaporizer ................................... 11

World Race ..............................44, 62. 7

Schedule ................................ 17

Wright Licenses Granted....................147, 17

Patent Upheld ........................... 2

Stabilizer, Automatic ......................

Wheel Control ........................... 6

Yaw Meter .................................

Zeppelin Record ............................. lj

Zeppelins for Germany........................ 1

ON HYDROPLANE" HULLS.

To the Editor:—

Your article in the May number describing the experiments with models of hydroplane hulls carried on by Naval Constructor 1L C. Richardson, is as timely as it is interesting to all who are concerned with the developments of air and water machines.

It has been the privilege and opportunity of the writer to have some knowledge of Naval . Constructor Richardson's experiments during their progress, and it is gratifying indeed that the results of this valuable work are to be available to the general public.

In the last part of your article in the May number of Aeronautics there appears to be some confusion in the figures referring to the different model forms. Model 1511-1, shown in the photograph Plate A, Figure 2, was a true V-type, as stated and substantially identical with 1602-1, shown in Figures j and 3. Through the very great courtesy of Mr. Richardson, the writer was permitted to witness the experiments from which the photograph Figure 2 was taken. This model was considered satisfactorv in every way except as to the sheet of water thrown.

It was the privilege of the writer to propose to Mr. Richardson and his assistants that the true V-form, 1602-1, should be modified by making the V-sections as shown hy model 1617-2. The idea expressed bv the writer in proposing this change was that the energy which the true V-model absorbed in hoisting the sheets of water on either side could be saved by so curving the sides of the bow as to throw the sheets of water downwardly to get an upward reaction by the reversal of the rlow —this on the well-known principle <*i reaction turbines in which the flow of the impelling fluid is reversed to obtain the greatest reaction. Thf writer's suggestion was verv cordiallv received, Mr. Richardson promising to try the idea out at once and report results. Dur-

ing the following week the full bow model, 1591-3, was tried and also 1617-2,. as proposed by the writer. The very gratifying results in connection with the hollow V-scction were very kindly reported by letter from Mr. Richardson to the writer as soon as the experiments were carried out. In a very kind letter, Mr. Richardson acknowledged the writer's suggestion of the hollow V-form and reported . the remarkably superior results indicated by this model.

During the time that the model experiments with, the hollow V-form were being carried on, the writer designed and began construction of a twenty-foot hydroplane hull embodying the same idea This hydroplane was in process of building when Mr. Richardson's report was received. It has since been completed and a 40-h.p. aeronautical engine obtained for driving it with air propeller, but owing to pressure of other matters the engine has not yet been installed. :

From the model experiments carried out and the practical, results that have since been obtained by the Curtiss Company and the Burgess Company under the direction of the navy, with full sized machines, there can be little doubt that the hollow V-bow is to be a feature of very many of the most successful machines from now forward.

It is from the strongest conviction of the value of this form of bow that the present letter is being written to your magazine with the view of setting out clearly for the benefit of the many constructors who will be interested, the precise type of hull which shows the most gratifying behavior in every way. The matter is well summed up in para: graph "b" of Constructor Richard: son's conclusions:

"Hollow V sections keep the spray down, cut the water more easily and cleanly, plane better and great-lv reduce shock on landing or when plowing through broken water, and practically eliminate the necessity of shock absorbers."

Verv truly yours,

SPENCER HEATH.

LOENING ENTERS RUS SIAN NAVAL CONTEST

Grover- C. Loening, who coi eludes his work with the Wripl Company in July, will take up fl ing boat work in the vicinity ( New York. He has entered tl comiietition for the design of hydn planes to be held by the Imperii Russian Navy, for which $3,200 hav heen offered in three prizes. Th designs entered must be forwarde by August 14th to the Committe for the Hydroaeroplane Competitiot Naval General Staff, Admiraltv, S Petersburg. The requirements ca for machines far in advance in pov er, size and efficiency of any no known to be in use.

The machines desired must hav not less than two motors; it mu; be capable of carrying for 630 mile at 63 m. p. h. two pilots, two ol servers and a mechanic, weighin not less than 770 lbs.; full pre visions of oil, fuel and water fr. the complete flight, and an add tional weight of 330 pounds; mi tors accessible for inspection, adjus ment, repair, and replacement c parts during flight; motors capabl of starting by pilot; pilots must b able to relieve each other durin flight; horizontal flight possible wit two-thirds the maximum moto horsepower available in flight. Pre vision must be made for a clea field of vision for the two observ ers, space for mounting machin gun, a wireless installation, a search light, and a bomb-dropping apparatus

The machines are required to b thoroughly seaworthy and so ai ranged that -they will be reasonabl. stable when afloat with all motor stopped, and that the propeller shall not come in contact with th water.

Further details regarding condi tions and rules of design competi tion may be seen at the office o Aeronautics.

I think you have one of the bes-magazines in the world, and woulu not do without it for double th. present price.

W. E. L., Ft. Worth, Tex.

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Aeronaut Leo Stevens

Leading Balloon Builder of the World

Balloons

to carry One to Fifty Passengers

Leading Sportsmen use a Stevens Outfit

AIRSHIPS, AEROPLANES AND BALLOONS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION

USED BY NINETY-FIVE PER CENT. OF THE CLUBS IN THIS COUNTRY AND CANADA

GAS GENERATORS, PARACHUTES, SAFETY-PACKS

If It's in the Aerial Line, Let Me Estimate I Box 181, Mad. Sq., New York

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PATENTS

SECURED or FEE RETURNED VICTOR J. EVANS & COMPANY

Send sketch or model for FREE search of Patent Office record. Write for our Guide Books and What to Invent with valuable List of Inventions Wanted sent Free. Send for our special list of prizes offerer! for Aeroplanes. $600,000 Offered in Prizes for Airships. We are Experts in Aeronautics and have a special Aeronautical Department! Copies of Patents in Airships, 10 cents each.

Main Offices: 724-726 NINTH STREET,N. VM WASHINGTON. D. C.

TENTS

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Ex-mcmbcr Ex.mininiS Corpi, U. 8. P.t.nt Oltlo.

Attorney-Bt-L«w and Solicitor of Patenti

American and foreign patents secured promptly and with special regard to the complete legal protection of The invcntTon Handbook for inventors sent upon request. 30 McGill Blde. WASHINGTON. D. C.

DON'T w"te us vnless

l-'vJli * you are interested in a reliable, efficient ardeconomical power plant. Hat is the only kind we build. Four sizes. Reasonable Prices

Kemp Machine Works Muncie, Ind.

The

SLOANE SCHOOL OF AVIATION

Superior Training MONOPLANES and FLYING-BOATS

■Address 1

Sloane Aeroplane Co.

1733 Broadway

New York

The Thomas School

OF AVIATION

OFFERS SUPERIOR ADVANTAGES

Address, Thomas Bros. Aeroplane Co. BATH, N. Y.

WIRE

We make an extra high grade plated finish wire for aviators' use.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ADDRESS

John A. Roebling's Sons Co.

TRENTON, N. J.

f LYING

By HAMEL and TURNER

Large 8vo., cloth, 338 pp.

$3.50 postpaid

The one best practical non-technical bookoftlie year. Recommended to pilots, students, amateurs, prospective purchasers and the casually interested.

AERONAUTICS-250 W. 54th St.. NewYork.

PATENTS

THAT PROTECT AND PAY rnri BOOKS. ADVICE AND SEARCHES F KLI

Send sketch or model for search. Highest References Best Results. Promptness Assured. WATSON E. COLEMAN, Patent Lawye 624 F Street. N. W. Washington. D. <

INVENTORS' MODEL

Constructed of any material

Estimates made from drawings. Low prices.

H. C. BROWN, Machinist 54 PARK AVENUE -:- BROOKLYN. N.

The

Wright

Company

(The

Wright

Patents)

u r THE NEW WRIGHT f AEROPLANES

For sport, exhibition or military use, over land or water now embody the improvements that have been suggested by the experiments quietly conducted during the past ten years.

The Wright Company

DAYTON, OHIO New York Office: 11 Pine St.

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