Aeronautics

Volume 14 - No. 3 - 1914 February

Table of Contents PDF Document


The American Magazine of Aeronautics was the first commercial magazine in the United States of America about national and international aviation. There were reports on patents and flight contests. The journal was published from July 1907 to July 1915. All pages from the years 1907 to 1915 are available with photos and illustrations as full text, for free.

However, if this form of presentation is inadequate, especially as regards the photos and illustrations, you can download all the editions as a PDF document with table of contents, photos and technical drawings, for a small fee. In order to search for topics and terms, please use also the available PDF documents. Please, use the free sample pdf document to check the quality of the PDF documents offered.



Standard Curtiss Flying Boat, 4 Passengers

Take out the

:URTISS MOTORS

And the big things they have helped to accomplish during the past six years—

There Really Isn't Much Left in American Aviation to Brag About,—Is There?

du cannot afford to buy or build an aeroplane without consider-g Curtiss Motors. Catalogs on Request

HE CURTISS MOTOR CO., 21 Lake St., Hammondsport, N. Y.

On the Way to Two Million

THE demand for Bosch Magnetos is such that within a remarkably few years it has been necessary to greatly increase manufacturing schedules. The Bosch Factories are well on the way to supplying the two millionth magneto.

THE

Bosch Magneto

remains the one perfectly reliable ignition source and as such it i? universally recognized. ^ It is so well made, so carefully designed that its regularity can be depended upon under all conditions. You always will have confidence when your engine is Bosch-Equipt. Cfl If you will tell us the engine you use we shall recommend the magneto mosl suitable for it and send you literature describing the magneto in detail.

Why not be among the Two Million Satisfied

Bosch MagnetoCompany

201 West 46th Street : New York

In answering advertisements please mention tliis magazine.

PROPELLER EXPERIMENTS—By M. B. Sellers

Series 1—Oct. 28 to Nov. 6, 1913.

apparatus described, constantin profile tested.

The object of the present investigation is to determine the thrust and speed of various propellers under the same torque, and in this series the Constantine profile is compared with some other types.

If we compare a propeller blade to an aeroplane wing, the thrust will correspond to the lift, and the turning moment to the drift. The propeller, acting on air, in motion axially, might roughly be compared to an aeroplane climbing.

Of two propellers, identical except in blade profile, the torque being the same, that giving the greater thrust will have the more efficient profile (i. e., the higher lift ratio). This, however, involves a consideration of the angle of attack; one profile may be the more efficient at one angle and the other at another angle.

The angle of attack of an element of a propeller blade rotating at a fixed point will depend on its inclination, velocity and on the velocity and direction of the part of the slip stream which it encounters. It would seem that this angle does not differ greatly for fixed point rotation from that in flight; however, I shall consider this matter at another time.

As this inquiry concerns the direct connected propeller with small angle of attack, the pitch of the test propellers was purposely made short.

Apparatus—The function of the present apparatus is to rotate all propellers with the same torque, to measure the thrust, and to enable the speed to be determined. For this I employ a descending weight, rotating the propeller by means of a cord wound around a drum. This device, though primitive, possesses some advantages over more elaborate apparatus.

In Fig. 1 the drum D is affixed to the shaft S turning in bearings CC. The propeller A is fastened to the boss B by two screws. The shaft has a play axially of % in., and the thrust of the propeller extends the spring F, moving the pointer E over the scale G. In Fig. 2 the cord which leads from the drum D over the pulleys H and I to the fastening J, is shown. 1 With the present arrangement, the drum makes 60 revolutions during the descent of the weight W, and it was found that the acceleration continued throughout this run. To obviate this, the weight P was suspended from W by the cord K. By adjusting the lengthy of K and weight of P, the proper acceleration was produced by P and W acting together, and after P had struck the floor the speed was maintained constant by W acting alone. To keep the cord from escaping, the loop L, Fig. 3, was made in its end. The rotation at constant speed varied from 35 to 40 revolutions with different propellers, during which time the pointer remained stationary. The time was taken from the moment when P struck the floor till W struck P; the possible error was one-fifth second, giving speed error between

termine speed accurately.

5 and 10 per cent. It was not intended to de-

To insure an open scale several springs were used, one from 0 to 10, one from 8 to 18, etc. The calibration was tested every few runs. The aggregate thrust error did not exceed ]/> oz. The drum measures 1J4 in. x 6 in.; the actual measured torque (at 1 ft. .) was 3.8 oz. All propeller blades were segmental as shown in Fig. 4. The pitch of all, except Nos. 3 and 4, is 10 in., practically uniform (except near hub). Propellers lb and le are modifications of la. Type b has the Constantin wind deflecting curve at the entering edge. No. 1 and No. 2 are the same except in thickness. The table gives the thrust in ounces and revolutions per minute.

It is seen that the Constantin profiles are inferior to types a and c; this was a surprise to me because, although it confirmed my original opinion, it was contrary to the reported results obtained with this profile.

In the second experiment with No. lb', where the weight \Y has been increased to give a torque of 5.6 oz., the velocity has risen to 800 rev.; but the thrust is still less than that for la or lc. The conclusion is obvious.

710 3 J^u /'•'V/c Tio-f is" pitch lit)1 2?'> 3%' /■>■">'

The c type is more efficient than the a type, at least for small angles of attack.

No. Id, cambered on face 1-16 in., gave .•liyhtlv less thrust than with flat face.

The" superiority of No. 2 over No. 1 shows the advantage of a thin blade.

Continitciloit pc'if

FOREIGN AERONAUTICAL MOTORS

By the Staff Correspondent.

The variety of different types of motors exhibited at the recent Paris Aeronautical Salon would indicate that European designers and manufacturers are still at a difference of opinion as to which is the best type of motor for the purpose. It is not the purpose of this article, however, to discuss suitability or prophesy the ultimate type. We will confine ourselves to the salient points of each motor, commencing with those of the stationary type.

The Renault is probably the best known of the foreign motors in the United States because of the fact that our Government has purchased ten or more of these during the past year, and the American cross-country record was accomplished by Lieut. Milling with a Burgess tractor biplane fitted with a 70-h.p. Renault. This engine is built in one of 70 and 100-h.p. sizes. The smaller motor has eight individual, air-cooled cylinders arranged on one crank case in groups of 4 at 90 degrees to each other and acting upon a single crank shaft. A single cam shaft also operates all the valves, the inlet valves being in pockets on the sides of the cylinders and the exhaust valves in the heads.

The cylinders have a bore of 334 in. and a stroke of 4^ in., and the motor develops its rated horsepower at 1,800 r.p.m. As this speed is not suitable for direct operation, the propeller shaft is formed by an extension of the cam shaft, which, of course, rotates at one-half the speed of the crank shaft, or 900 r.p.m. This feature has undoubtedly contributed largely to the sticcess of the engine because of

the fact that the slow speed propeller, for slow speed machines, is much more efficient. It is also claimed by the manufacturers that any gyroscopic effect of the propeller is overcome by the crank shaft rotating, in the opposite direction.

Cylinders are cooled by a fan on the crank shaft which delivers a large volume of air into a chamber between the two groups of cylinders formed by a sheet metal housing over the top of the engine, and the air passes out through the horizontal flanges on the cylinders, thereby giving very uniform cooling to each one. This

fan, however, absorbs a considerable amount of power, probably not less than 6 h.p. when the engine is operating at full speed, and it is a question whether this arrangement is lighter per horsepower delivered to the propeller shaft than the water-cooled design when one subtracts the power required to operate the fan, and adds the weight of the fan and its sheet metal housing and the rather heavy cooling flanges which are necessary on the eight cylinders. The convenience of the air cooling, however, is a great advantage.

The carburetor is of the manufacturer's own make of the duplex type, having a single float chamber and two separate jet chambers, with an inlet pipe leading to each group of four cylinders. The engine is fitted with a single spark, Bosch magneto of the H.L. type, operating at engine speed and firing all eight cylinders.

Lubrication is accomplished by a gear pump located in the oil sump in the bottom of the crank case. This pump delivers the oil under a slight pressure to the main bearings, from where it is thrown off into circular oil scoops on the crank shaft, lubricating the connecting rods by centrifugal force. All other parts of the motor are oiled by splash. Baffle plates are interposed between the base of the cylinders and the crank case to prevent over-lubrication of the cylinders.

The two groups of cylinders do not stand directly opposite each other on the crank case, but arc staggered the necessary amount, so that all the connecting rods are alike, and each has separate big end bearings. The weight of this motor, complete with magneto and carburetor, is 415 lbs.

The 100-h.p. Renault is of the same general appearance as the 70-h.p. size, except that it has 12 cylinders, 334-in. bore by 5^-in. stroke, and these are arranged in two groups of six at an angle of 60 degrees to each other. This difference between the angle of the cylinders of the 8-cylinder and 12-cylinder motors is, of course, necessary in order to secure uniform firing.

fn the case of this larger motor, the cylinders are placed opposite each other, and the two connecting rods act upon a common crank shaft bearing, one being a master rod and the other being attached to it with a small pin like the piston pin arrangement. Two single spark Bosch magnetos are used, each firing one set of six cylinders. A double carburetor, as on the 8-cylinder motor, also divides the motor into two separate 6-cylinder engines.

This engine is very long and somewhat clumsy for its power, weighing 630 lbs. However, it develops its rated horsepower quite easily, as was shown when one was recently tested by the U. S. Government at Annapolis, and developed 103 h.p. on the propeller shaft at 900 r.p.m., and, of course, was developing somewhat more than this on the crank shaft because of the loss in the reduction gears. To be covtim(c<l

THE SPERRY GYROSCOPIC STABILIZER

One January 21st, Lawrence B. Sperry left for France with the latest development of the gyroscopic stabilizer, with which experiments have been conducted at the Cur-tiss plant, at Hammondsport, for the past eighteen months.

The device may be placed in any convenient location on a gasless craft and connected by cables with ailerons or warping wings and with the elevator. The sole ambition in life of the controlling gyroscopes used is to maintain their position parallel with the horizon. A tilting up on one wing end opens a small valve in an air cylinder and permits air from a storage tank to move a piston. The piston rod is connected to a vertical lever, to which cables run to the ailerons. It is clear that this can be arranged to pull upward the aileron on the high side and create a downward pressure, and the reverse for the low side.

The same gyroscopes resent longitudinal tipping, and another cylinder and piston are employed for operating the elevator.

To bank on a turn, the operator in the Curtiss machine, for instance, moves his shoulder brace as ordinarily. This, of course, opens the valve in the cylinder again and the ailerons operate to bank. At the point desired, the automatic device, the gyroscope, takes up the work again and maintains the set bank, until the operator puts the machine back on a level keel again. As a matter of fact, the pilot "fools" the gyroscope by changing its horizontal relation to the horizon, and it goes right on believing that any further alteration in bank beyond the amount set for is abnormal and should be automatically corrected. A similar stunt is done to volplane.

The illustration (Fig. 1) shows the earlier

device located under the seats of the Navy's "C-2." The device in the foreground is the one for lateral stability. A separate unit was used for longitudinal stability, located in the bow of the boat. A is the arm opening the valve. A cable is run to a foot lever; pulling on this opens the valve to the outside air and cuts out the automatic device. C is the lever which is hooked by a rod to the usual Curtiss shoulder yoke control. E is the piston rod which operates the lever C, as is obvious.

Fig. 1 also shows a diagrammatic view of the wiring of the aileron control system. H is a little lever which opens the shoulder braces to permit easy ingress. At J is the device equalizing the pressure on the ailerons. Many changes have been made in the device now taken to Europe, as will be noticed later on.

Electric current to rotate the gyroscopes, which are practically induction motors, at

a speed of 14,000 r.p.m. is obtained from a generator, which is now driven by a belt from the aeroplane's engine. Increase of engine speed shifts the belt, so that a fairly uniform generator speed is obtained. This generator furnishes both direct and alternating current, which may be used for lighting, ignition, wireless or other purposes. This generator weighs about 22 lbs. The gyroscopes, their frames, cylinders and other mechanisms, weigh about 40 lbs. A compressed air tank adds some 12 lbs. Uniform pressure is maintained in the tank by an automatic pump fitted in a hole drilled in the top of the cylinder, and forces air and gases from the engine cylinder into the reservoir 011 the firing stroke. Later on electricity will be used instead of the compressed air tank.

Continued on 7><me 3'J

THE THOMAS FLYING BOAT

The 1914 Thomas flying boat has many new features, both in design and construction, and is in keeping with the Thomas reputation of high-grade design and efficiency. During the past year several methods of construction were experimented with.

First, the all-wood hull was tried and discarded because of the great amount of water absorbed by the planking. It was

found that the all-wood hull would increase in weight over 100 lbs. after being in use a couple of weeks.

Next, a wooden hull was tried with metal bottom. This was found to have advantages over the all-Avood hull, but still the sides absorbed a great deal of water.

Finally, a third type was tried, in which the hull was built of wood and then entirely covered with metal. This boat was

put through a number of tests during the summer and fall, and in efficiency, both in the water and air, more than filled its designer's expectations. It has been timed to leave the water in eight seconds from the time the engine was started, and to have a speed of over 65 miles an hour in the air.

The 1914 model contains all the good features of last year's model, and in addition has new ones in both design and construction. The new model might well be called "The boat with a backbone,'' as, contrary to the usual practice in flying-boat construction of building over frames and fitting in braces and centerboard last, the new model is built from the keel up, just as all boats are built, from the smallest motor boat to an ocean liner.

Length over all, 25 ft. 5 in.; length of hull, 23 ft; span of top plane, 36 ft. 4 in.; span of lower plane, 28 ft. 4 in.; chord, 5 ft.; gap, 68 in.; top beam, 40 in.; bottom beam, 34y2 in.; maximum depth, 36 in.; total area of main planes, 310 sq. ft.; power plant, Austro-Daimler 90 h. p.; total weight of Hying boat, empty, 1,275 lbs. Hull proper is 23 ft. in length, beam 34l/2 in. at bottom and 40 in. at top. Divided into water-tight compartments, any one of sufficient capacity to float the machine. Spruce keel entire length of boat; from this the body of the hull is built up on ribs of spruce spaced 4 in. apart and double planked with cedar. Two layers of planking. Decided V

bottom, from the step to a point forward of the seats, which makes a stronger construction than flat bottom and does not add to weight. After planking, the boat is entirely covered with a special grade of galvanized sheet steel. It will not absorb water, is easy to repair in case of puncture, and will last indefinitely. Mahogany spray shields; cockpit paneled with same material. Seats upholstered in dark gray. Center panel of spray shield operated by

small lever in cockpit, making an easy entrance to the boat.

Bottom of boat is protected by a large center skid of ash, running entire length, and two smaller ones on the sides. Center skid is fastened to inside keel by an improved method, which prevents leakage. Skid is shod with steel, and at the step has a heavy heel which is capable of supporting the entire weight of the machine. The boat is finished in battleship-gray color, and all metal work is highly polished.

The hull has been designed for use with the engine mounted either midway between the planes or on the hull itself. With the motors mounted between the planes, the boat has extra seating capacity in the after cockpit.

Wings are built up in panels, for convenience in shipping; upper plane containing seven sections, and lower five. AH guy wires 3/32 in. galvanized steel cable, fitted with a special type of Bleriot turnbuckle. All control wires are doubled for safety. The standard Thomas strut socket is used, and struts can be taken out and planes packed without losing any wires. Wing curve is standard Thomas curve, used for past four years. The stabilizer is 10 ft. in length and an average of 2 ft., with an area of 20 sq. ft. The two elevator flaps contain Z2l/2 sq. ft., and the balanced rudder 9 sq. ft. The ailerons have a length of 11 ft. and an average width of 18 in., and contain about 33 sq. ft.

The boat is fitted with a new system of control. The elevator is worked in the usual way, by forward and backward movement of the steering column, and the rudder by rotating wheel on it, but the aileron control is worked by foot pedals. The whole control is very neatly worked out and undoubtedly will be adopted as standard, with a view to meeting the United States Navy requirements.

THE SPERRY GYROSCOPIC STABILIZER

Continued from page 37

A dial on one side of the device shows the angle of flight at all times. A plate anemometer, which may be located in any convenient place, shows on a dial, similar to an automobile speedometer, the speed of the aeroplane relative to the air. Adjustment can be made so that a fall in speed to any set point will operate the air valve in the cylinder and cause the machine to 'plane until the proper speed has again been attained.

The bow of the boat shown in Fig. 1 contains, in the experimental device, a duplicate of the set shown, connected to the elevator control system and operating in the same manner as the other unit. Added to this was the plate anemometer.

In the latest machine, the gyroscopes for both stability systems and all mechanisms are located in one unit.

Table For Calculating Weights of Aeroplane frame-Work

m

/*

 

r

i

y

3

?■ r

li-

ll

ll

ii

/i

4

>8

2'

r

00014

V'f

mm

OB234

00261

100328

 

00422

00461

00516

00563

0O6C9

1/0656

f*703

00750

   

00141

mil

aotsi

00352

c:tr

0

0O563

00633

00701

00733

0084*

31 4

0016*

.0105

0113

     

oomi

00375

I W

00S 6 3

0065b

00750

00844

OO930

0/03

0II3

0122

0131

'

JJI50

     

003V

11,9

MSH6

00703

ooeio

00938

0IO5

0/17

0129

.014/

0152

0164

 

0188

   

00281

«w.

00563

00703

 

00934

0/I3

0/27

0141

HISS

0/69

■om

0147

02/1

2225

   

00328

06491

00656

oosie

0096*

JO/15

0/31

0/48

0/6 4

0160

0197

0213

0230

0246

0263

   

J30563

00750

60936

0113

0131

0/50

0/61

0/88

0206

0225

0244

0263

02BI

O300

'if"

0Q42Z

00631

.00844

OIOS

0/21

0/4$

0169

0I1O

02/1

0232

0253

0274

0215

0316

M336

A-

00469

00703

00938

01/7

0/*l

0164

0168

0211

0234

0258

0281

0305

C328

0352

.0375

't

0->Sl&

00733

0103

1121

01*5

OISO

11206

0232

0258

0264

0301

0335

0)61

0387

04 3

 

aoss3

:0344

01/3

0141

0169

0117

0225

.0251

028/

0309

0338

0366

0314

0422

0450

 

00601

O01H

Oil!

0IS2

0163

02/3

024 4

0274

.0305

0335

036b

:316

■427

0457

0488

 

O06S6

' 104

.0131

.016*

0/17

0230

0263

.0215

0328

0361

0314

0*27

 

0412

0525

 

90?"-

.0105

.0141

.0176

0211

0246

026/

0316

0352

0387

0422

0*57

0412

0527

0563

2

00750

.0113

0150

owe

0225

0263

.0300

.0330

0375

0413

0450

.0*88

0525

.0563

■600

it-hueit

0127

.0169

02/1

0253

.0215

.0336

03S0

0*22

0464

0506

0548

0511

0633

0675

ei' ocas

om

o/oe

0214

02BI

0328

0375

0422

04(9

0516

0563

O601

0656

0703

0750

   

0103

.0155

02oe

0256

0301

.036/

04/3

0*6*

0SI6

0567

0611

0670

0722

0773

0825

y -

0H3

.0161

OS25

0281

       

0563

06/1

0675

0731

.0788

~/fl44

0100

3i '

0122

0/63

0244

£305

0366

0427

0*8$

"546

0601

0670

0731

0112

0853

0114

J1975

A-

CI3I

0/97

0261

032$

0314

0459

0525

051/

0656

0722

0788

0853

.01/1

018*

.105

 

CW

02/1

.0281

0352

0422

049.?

0563

.06 33

0703

0733

Of4 4

1 «

, 1-4

.105

.113

4 '

.01 SO

0225

, ■>' '

0375

0450

0525

0600

.06 7!

0750

0625

0100

.0*75

0/05

.113

.120

               

Cc

IcJatid

9> HL.Prout

This Totle G'rcs rh, IVeiaht, Per Inch of lenofh, of Oiffer.nt

Sizes of Sprue*

Por/Ish Multiply By 1.467

for /found or fll/pficol Shapes Malhp/y By .705 4-

rh/s Pob/e is Computet/ on rhe Basis of Spruce * .015 Per Cubic Inch and /Ish - . Pee 6 Per Cubic Inch._

THE BOLAND FLYING BOAT

The Boland flying boat made its debut at the Motor Boat Show in February. Here is surely an original affair—a tailless, rudderless, aileronless monoplane flying boat, and alleged to be non-infringing!

Frank E. Boland began experimenting, as we recall, in 1907, and bought an almost unliable machine in 1908 and started to work. Eventually he brought to the public notice his ''jib" system of control, with which readers are entirely familiar through drawings and descriptions of earlier machines. To steer the machine, the hand-wheel is turned left or right for steering thus respectively. The cable pulls one jib only inward, creating a resistance on that side of the machine tending to turn and bank it. The jib is revoluble about an oblique axis from the lower end of the forward strut to the upper end of the rear strut. To balance, the jib on the high side is pulled in, the hand-wheel being turned naturally to the high side. The jib produces a drag and a down pressure and the aeroplane rights. To operate the elevator, the wheel and steering column is pushed forward for "going down" and pulled toward the operator for "going up."

The wings, rigid, are guyed to a mast in the stern of the boat. A light cantilever bridgl extends from the boat out to the wing-end I floats and acts as a truss for the jibs and the floats.

The two-step boat is of mahogany ribs audi stays, covered with one ply spruce and a layeil of Irish linen painted with Conover "dope'l and enamel varnish. A 3-in. ash gunwale ex-1 tends along the deck and projects forward tad form the support for the elevator. The engine] struts are also fastened to this gunwale. Thej cockpit carries two tandem; 6-in. gunwale. The passenger sits under the horizontal center of gravity. At every step is a handhole for bailing out. On the dashboard there is a hand pressure pump for gasoline supply, a tachometer and an air gauge. A magneto cut-out-button is located in the hand-wheel, and there, is also a switch in the hub of the wheel. Thej right foot operates the throttle and spark, the spark advance being connected with the throttle.

The hollow mast is of oak and mahogany^ laminated. This is fastened in the keel audi

Continued on page, i'i

- .B;B?k*^}---

A i>

J

ANOTHER NEW CURTISS FLYING BOAT

A change in hull design, in engine section ubing and wing-end floats are the principal features of the latest Curtiss flying boat, ex-libited at the Motor Boat Show in New York u February.

There is no folding hood, as the mahogany idieathing is brought up in a solid rounded :orm. At the forward seat the sides flare out ilightly to make more room. The shoulder )races which operate the ailerons fold outward )n either side, making for easy entrance and >gress. An Elliott instrument board under the lood contains a clock, indicating barometer, achometer and air speed indicator. A knife ■witch for the magneto is fastened to the tinier side of the hood. As the main 30-gallon fcas tank is under the rear passenger seat, air >ressure is employed, and there is an air gauge itted under the hood. A pop-off valve limits he amount of pressure. The air pump is geared to the cam shaft. This forces gasoline nto the small 3-gallon gravity tank just back )f the radiator, which is now slightly enlarged, md has thin vertical tubes. In conjunction /ith the instrument board there is also an angle >f flight indicator.

Curtiss boats are now made with one-piece ■rings, which allows more strength and better ilignment. The lower plane in the engine sec-ion is of mahogany, cut out to allow another ;eat for the third and fourth passengers. The ipper wings separate in the center of the engine section. The lower wings are each ;horter than the two upper halves on account )f allowance for the above arrangement in the ower engine section. Both upper and lower ft-ings are connected to the engine section by

Q. D. sockets. A removable pin permits rapid demounting. All struts may be removed with the wings without loosening up any of the guy wires. The power plant remains intact with the boat.

Under the wing ends are floats,, fitted to the curve of the wings, straight sided, terminating in a sharp vertical edge at the rear under the beam. A flat paddle is attached on the under side. Non-skid panels are fitted as usual. The engine is an O-N 90-100, which insures an average of around 60 m.p.h. The total weight of the machine, without operator or supplies, is 1,400 lbs.

The surfaces are covered with linen, coated with spar varnish, with a high gloss. There is a starting crank, of course. This conflicts with the single large beam running down from the engine bed to the bow, but as the engine does not have to be "swung," there is no objection on this account.

The forward part of the hull has a V bottom, the greatest curvature being forward, decreasing to straight lines at the step. A towing ring is in the extreme nose of the boat, and the bow is protected with copper sheathing. The usual hand holes are to be found in the top of the tail of the boat. The wings have been flattened somewhat and the angle of flight is about 6 degrees. The fixed tail surface has a slight lifting angle. The propeller is a standard Curtiss, metal tipped, 8 ft. diameter by Sl/2 ft. pitch. The steering column provides two wheels for either of two men to use. Under the engine is a drip pan, which protects the occupants of the rear seat. The chord has been shortened to 5 ft.

THE U. S. NAVY'S LATEST FLYING BOATS.

The last three machines supplied the U. S. Navy are similar to the Curtiss boat seen at the Boat Show and the previous boats supplied in a general way. There is no seat under the engine for extra passengers and no drip pan under the engine. The chord is 5 ft. 6 in. The gasoline tanks flank the engine, as shown in the drawing, and the upper plane is fitted with extensions. The hood is rigid, but is differently shaped, as will be noticed in the sketch. The engine tube bracing at the rear beam is not as simple as the Show boat.

CURTISS FLYING BOAT FOR ITALIAN NAVY

Another new hull design has been employed in making the machine for the Italian Navy. The hull is straight sided instead of flaring at the forward seat, as is the custom in the standard and the U. S. Navy boats, where the occupants sit side by side. But two occupants are provided for in the Italian boat, placed tandem, permitting a narrower hull. The vertical sides are of mahogany veneer, 3-ply. This enables the entire side to be made of one

piece, i. e., the mahogany is cut out the full shape instead of being used in narrow strips. Otherwise, the internal construction is the same as that of other Curtiss boats.

The occupants, seated tandem, are entirely protected except for the face when the hood is down; when the hood is raised, they are completely covered up. This hood is constructed similar to an automobile top, with bows and fabric; transparent material is inserted in the cloth between the bows and across the front. The bows run fore and aft, and the top opens in the longitudinal center and folds down within the sides of the hull.

The hull being narrower than standard, allows of a transparent strip on either side of (he hull in the lower engine section, so that

the rear occupant has sight directly downward' The cockpit, in which both sit, is elliptical in J shape. The front wing beam crosses the cockpit just ahead of the rear man. Controls are standard Curtiss, except that they are so arranged either man may do the operating, orj can be disconnected at once for instruction work. In this boat there are two spars running down from the engine bed to the bow of the boat. In other respects the machine is the same as that seen at the Boat Show.

The weight, empty and without supplies, is 1,400 lbs. The chord of the wings in this boat] is 5 ft. 6 in.; the spread is the same as tha Show boat.

PROPELLER EXPERIMENTS

Continued from puije S"i

With zero pitch, type b gave practically no thrust, while type c gave 9 oz.

The No. 4, same as No. 1 except that it has 15-in. pitch, gave less thrust than No. 1.

No. 5, with 24-in. diameter, gave more thrust than No. 1; and No. 6, with blade 4*4-in. wide, gave same thrust as No. 5 at slightly reduced speed.

Table 1.

Propeller

Thrust,

Speed.

 

Propeller

Thrust,

Speed.

ounces

rev. p.m.

 

ounces

rev. p.m. j

n

2012

750

 

2c

26

800

lx

13

670

 

3c

9

920

lb

II1!!

630

 

4a

18

640

lb'

II

600

 

5a

26

1,100 1

lc

23

800

 

5b

16

960 1

Id

2212

800

5c

27

1,200

2a

23^

800

6a

26

1,050 I

2b

IS

800

 

lb'a

17

800

2b'

18

800

       

(To be continued)

THE BOLAND FLYING BOAT.

Continued from page in

guys run to the wings, the bow of the boat| and the engine bed. The main wing spars end in a special socket on the mast. The wings have a camber of 4j/_. in, tapering to 3^4 in. and are set at a 5-in. angle. The wings arei also set at a dihedral angle in the later direcJ tion. Wings are of linen, Conover treated anJ spar varnished.

The 70-h.p. Boland engine will be supplanteJ by the new 100-h.p. motor, Ay> x 5V2, drivinl a 4-bladed propeller 5^-ft. pitch by 7-ft. diaml eter; 100 h.p. is claimed at 1,250 r.p.m. Will the present engine the outfit weighs arounl 900 lbs.

Leonard W. Bonney, a former Wright flyerl is chief pilot with the Boland Aeroplane <Xl Motor Co. A description of the 100-h.p. Bo4 land engine will be given in a subsequent issue.

FOR FLYING BOATS USE

JEFFERY'S MARINE GLUE

Use our Waterproof Liquid Glue, or No. 7 Black, White, or Yellow Soft Quality Glue for waterproofing- the canvas covering of flying- boats. It not only waterproofs and preserves the canvas but attaches it to the wood, and with a coat of paint onee a year will last as long as the boat.

For use in combination with calico or canvas between veneer in diagonal planking, and for waterproofing muslin for wing surfaces. Send for samples, circulars, directions for use, etc.

L. W. FERDINAND & CO. 201 South Street, Boston, Mass., U. S. A.

Longren and his HALL-SCOTT powered tractor

The Young Aviation Co., Topeka, Kansas have written

"We have used No. 51 three seasons, has done elegant work all this time, no motor failure, and have filled more dates than any other aviator in the state of Kansas and most of Oklahoma and Nebraska.

Signed A. K. LONGREN."

Investigate our 100 H. P. equipment

Hall-Scott Motors Guarantee Success

Hall-Scott Motor Car Co.

818 Crocker Bldg. San Francisco, Cal.

AERONAUTICAL RADIATORS

Built in capacities and types for standard and special aviation motors

Wrile for prices on standard makes. Send your specifications for special designs

EL ARCO RADIATOR COMPANY

64th St. & West End Ave., New York City Also Manufacturers of Automobile Radiators of all types

PEDERSEN OIL PUMPS

have positive action, are small and light, easily applied to any motor

——"— Write for circular ———™c——

it; >;

>;

$

>: >] :♦. >; $

$

$

>: >' $ &

>] >;

>; >; >;

>;

i

>: >; >; >] >;

The Sloane Aeroplane Co. ;♦;

The only builders in the world of military mono- y

planes, biplanes and flying boats. Full equipment >j for military and naval aviation furnished.

SLOANE

FLYING BOATS

For Sporting and Naval Use

OWL BOATS

For Over Water and Land Flying

SLOANE MONOPLANES TRACTOR BIPLANES

and

Rear Propeller Gun-Planes

SLOANE AERO-SKIMMERS for sportsmen. Ideal for high speed travel on the water and delivery use on shallow streams.

GNOME —ANZANI—RENAULT, at lowest prices

Aeroplanes built to special design. Designs developed. Parts supplied—In fact everything aeronautical furnished.

Sloane Aeroplane Co.

1733 Broadway :: New York City

BOLAND AEROPLANE AND MOTOR COMPANY

THE BOLAND MOTOR

8 cyl. " V " type 6o H.P. 240 pounds.

RELIABILITY MAXIMUM POWER.

DURABILITY MINIMUM WEIGHT.

THE BOLAND TAILLESS BIPLANE

equipped with the Boland Control (two movements) and BOLAND MOTOR.

THE BOLAND CONTROL is the embodiment of utmost safety and simplicity in a new system of control which is basic in principle. Write fo'r particulars.

Factory: Ft. Center St., Newark, N. J.

Office: 1821 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

CAPITALIST or PROMOTER

.--Wanted —-—

PEDERSEN LUBRICATOR CO.

636-644 Firat Avenue, New York. U. S. A.

Will try to cross the Atlantic in shortest possible time with my new type airship

A Practical Accomplishment WALTER V. KAMP, 551W. 178th St., New,York

In answering advertisements please mention this magazine.

CURTTSS AIR BOAT TO CROSS ATLANTIC.

Rodman Wanamaker is having built by the Curtiss Aeroplane Cj. a huge flying boat in which an attempt is expected to be made to cross the Atlantic in its smallest dimension during the year.

At the p-esent "state of the art" it has been thought imp -ohable that crossing the pond would be accomplished. However, Curtiss has done a lot of things peopl; said he couldn't do, and this may be one of them. There are plenty of battleships scattered about this 1 ttle sphere. Perhaps this country, England, France. Germany and others could be induced to distribute a chain of boats along the projected route. At best, they would be some considerable distance apart: at the same time, any safeguard is better than none and it might be possible, by traveling at a great leight, with powerful glasses, to almost keep a battleship in sight at all times.

GLOBE AIR RACE.

It is clai ned the Panama-Pacific Exposition has

offered $150.000 in prizes for an air race around the

world, open to all types of craft, and will raise $150,000 moie.

AERO CLUB OF PHILADELPHIA DINNER.

The first annual hanquet of the Philadelphia Aero Club was held February 5th. The speakers were: Marshall Red, Henry M. Neely, William D. Harris, Ulysses S. Wilson, E. R. Brown, Dr. George S. Gass-ner. Percy Pierce was toastmaster. The club was founded in 911 and in the first two years many records were made in model flying. An incomplete aeroplane has been presented to the club.

STEVENS' LIFE PACK AGAIN DEMONSTRATED.

On Febri fry 4, Leo Stevens' "life pack" was again emplojtd by moving picture people for a sensational film. With two taxicabs, Rodman Law and Miss Const.i ice Bennett started across Brooklyn bridge and at the center leaped out and climbed over the rail anc —dropped. 1 f this had happened in France, the capers and magazines would have been full of the "wonderful" feat. Here, however, where the idea ori ;inated. such feats are so common they scarcely call for comment. The "pack," as everyone knows, is merely a silken parachute properly folded in a little big strapped to the shoulders. When the jump is made, the 'chute opens in 20 or 30 feet.

TALIAFERRO'S RECORD TRIP.

The official report of the trip of Lieut. Taliaferro, on January 20 'rom North Island, Cal., via Los Angeles and Pasadena to Elsinore, shows that he covered 224 miles in 3 hours and 50 minutes, an average of 58.4 miles p.-r hour.

Taliaferro flew at an average altitude of about 5,000 feet. Having obtained gasoline and oil from Elsinore, he flew to a point six miles southeast of Temecula, hmding there on account of the engine having stopped. He flew back to Elsinore, spending the night at that place (total distance in air for the day 270 miW>: total time in air 4 hours and 41 minutes). Leav ng Elsinore at 9:30 a. in. on the morning of January 21, he continued his flight until eight miles west cf Corona, where the engine stopped on account of tie poor gasoline obtained at Elsinore. He landed ii the only possible landing place in that part of the country, a very muddy, newly plowed field, at io:c8 a. m. (distance 35 miles, time 38 minutes). The field where he landed was so soft that the wheels sink into the ground to their hubs. This field was si rrounded on three sides by high hills and trees, a id a swamp on the fourth side, and as there was no place within a radius of 5 miles from which he coi.ld take to the air he deemed it inad-

visable to continue his flight. He dismounted the] machine, loaded it in a box car, and shipped it tdl San Diego by rail. The machine used was a Curtis! speed scout type, with Curtiss OX 90-100 horsepower' engine.

The summary of the reports from San Diego fori the week ending January 24 shows no flights, 45I passengers carried; total time in air 25 hours and 2S minutes. Since January 1 to January 24, there havl been 306 flights, 140 passengers carried; total time ill air 77 hours and 52 minutes. In the above total aia included three cross-country flights of 85, 134 anJ 220 miles.

IMPORT AND EXPORTS.

Imports.

For November..................................

11 months ending November 1, aeroplane

and parts ............................... $19,625!

Exports of Domestic Manufacture.

For November, 2 and parts................ 15>37,gl

11 months ending November, 18 and parts.. 79.55IS Exports of Foreign.

For November, none......................

11 months ending November, 2 and parts... 11,23.2,

In Warehouse, November 30.

3 Aeroplanes ............................. 7>623<

NEW ALTITUDE FLIGHT ENDS FATALLY.

After making a new American altitude record 01 [2,120 feet at San Diego, February 9, Lieut. Henry B. Post, army aviator, was killed, after descending] safely to within some 600 feet of the earth. It lei reported that at that height "the plane was seen ttl collapse" and the pilot was thrown clear of the] machine into five feet of water. The Signal Corpfl will, of course, make an official report.

The altitude record has been held by Beachey wlicj made 11,642 feet at Chicago in 1911. Lieut. Post's best flight was one of 152 miles in 2 days. (Seq issue of January 31.)

NILES FLIES UPSIDE DOWN.

C. S. Niles, second in the race around New York! a former Curtiss and Thomas biplane flyer, flew a Moisant monoplane upside down in a most sensational and heart-stopping flight at Mineola 011 February M In attempting to make the loop, it is reported till machine dropped tail first before getting completell over, but Niles was able to recover.

SCOTT TO DROP BOMBS.

Lieut. Riley E. Scott is on his way to San Diegtl to resume bomb dropping experiments after thosJ made with mediocre results at Washington two years! ago, due to inability of the machine used to lift the weight.

INTERNATIONAL BALLOON RACE.

R. H. Upson and Capt. II. E. Honeywell have so far been selected as two of the team to represent. Uncle Sam in the big race from Kansas City, Octo-, her 6. It is apparent that there will be no national, race this year to select the team as originally urged' by AERONAUTICS, finally put in practice and asl has been the custom for the past three years.

AVIATOR IN AIR SIXTEEN HOURSJ

Munich, Feb. 8.—The aviator lngold broke thel world's record for a cross country endurance flighil He remained in the air for 16 hours and 20 minutesl and covered a distance estimated at 1,050 miles witlil out landing, lngold started at M nlhausen, AlsaceB and flew far to the north. He then proceeded soutlil ward to Munich, lauding in a suburb.

Johannisthal, Feb. 3.—The aviator Brunolanger to-j day broke the world's record for an endurance flight. He remained in the air for fourteen hours and seven minutes.

'age 45

AERONAUTICS, Feb. 14, iyM

< BENOIST

announcement

The Benoist School of Aviation will open on Janua-/ 1st, at St. Petersburg, Florida. The school will be inder the personal supervision of Tom W. Benoist and Tony Jannus. We will also conduct the first regular schedule passenger-carrying air line in the world, St. Petersburg to Ta^ipa, Fla. Students who want to join the school and prospective agents who want their territory for the exclusive sale of our flying boats will do well to address

The Xew Benoist flying Jioat in Action

BENOIST AIR CRAFT COMPANY

St. Louis, Missouri or St. Petersburg Florida

GYRO MOTOR

50 H.P.

160 POUNDS

80 H.P.

207 POUNDS

Built of Nickel Steel and Vanadium Steel Throughout

Endurance Flying F ecord to Date, 4 hrs., 23 min.

From

"FLIGHT"

July 26th, 1913

"Some may say—to the obvious benefit of the Company whose representatives have adopted his very practical method of calling attention to the GYRO engine (50 h. p.) that it is all due to the motor, which probably develops about three times as much power as the machine requires for the purposes of straightforward flight."

Send for Catalog

THE GYRO MOTOR COMPANY, 774 Girard Street, Washington, D. C.

ALL MARINE FLYERS

Should investigate the merits of the Three-Bladed Paragons. Smaller Size than corresponding two blades, with fine lines of design, make them turn more freely. Free turning enables them to carry higher pitch. The added blade gives them a stronger hold on the air.

Results:—Less Vibration — Full Turning Speed — Higher Pitch Speed = Smaller Slip—Faster Flying—Stronger Manoeuvering—Safer Handling and Control.

Uncle Sam uses three-bladed Paragons almost exclusively in his Navy Boats—There's a reason and Paragon price economy besides.

There are questions in your mind. Write to ns for the answers intelligently stated and illustrated by photographs. Full brass blade protection at only nominal cost.

AMERICAN PROPELLER CO., 243-249 E. Hamburg St., Baltimore, Md.

In answering advertisements please mention this magazine.

OFFICERS.

Clarence I'. Wynne, President. Jos. A. Steinmetz, l.ff I'icc-Prcsident. \\'m. I). Harris, 2ii</ Tice-Prcsidcnt. ( iEORge S. Gassner, Secretary Laurence Marescii, Treasurer. Office of the Club, Pcl'.evue-Stratford, I'hila., Pa.

NOTICE TO MEMBERS.

Members of the Aero Club of Pennsylvania in good standing will receive semi-monthly copies of AERONAUTICS as one of the benefits of membership, together with the monthly journal "Flying." Py this arrangement, A. C. P. members obtain more from a magazine standpoint than those of any other club in the country. _

DEMAND FOR CHARAVAY

That the consistent good work of Charavay propellers and the high quality of construction is upholding their enviable reputation for efficiency and long service is evident from the number of new orders and repeats orders that the Sloane Aeroplane Company is continually receiving

The Sloane Aeroplane Company has just brought out a new 3 bladed type for flying-boats and tractors, the first of which was delivered to the U. S. Navy. No propeller is allowed to leave the factory before being inspected by an expert as to correct pitch and balance. The balancing is accomplished on a special ball bearing bracket and the weights of the blades are not allowed to vary a fraction of an ounce.

Amongst recent purchasers are the governments of the United States. Guatemala ami Mexico, Moisant International Aviators, Capt. Thomas S. Paldwin, ('apt. Hugh L. Willoughby, Lieut. J. M. Murray, Richmond Aeroplane Co., Lieut. Wall), Maximillian Schmitt, Penoist Aircraft Co., R. V. Morris, and E. P. Ford, son of the famous maker of Ford cars.

ST. PETERSBURG LINE ADDS NEW ROUTE.

The St. ['etersburg-Tampa Airboat Line, established by the Penoist Aircraft Company of St. Louis, has issued a statement of its first month's business, covering the 31 days of January. With no Sunday flying, this left only 27 possible days of operation. In these 27 days, 97 trips were made. Out of these, 4^/2 days of flying were lost, 3 days loss was caused by a broken crank shaft in the motor, and the balance ascribed to bad weather.

There were carried in all, 184 passengers, and the boat made a distance of 2,234 miles, or 4,468 passenger-miles, which surely compares not only favorably, but much better than the usual taxicab or automobile used for commercial work.

The line has proved highly remunerative, as the cost of upkeep has been much less than for the same work with an automobile, and the amounts received tor the work have, of course, been greater.

The first understanding was that this line was to be operated for three months during the tourist season, but the business men have been so delighted with the performances of the boats that they are now making arrangements to continue, the line clear through thi summer and fall, and increase the number of machines to a great extent for next winter.

Two more machines have been received now and arc to be put in active service.

Another line is contemplated between St. Petersburg and Tarpmi Springs, a distance of about 45 miles. This to make stops at Pass-A-Grille, Clearwater, Pel-lair and Tarpon Springs.

AERO MART

FOR SALE—Our last year's monoplanes and bl planes; very cheap for cash, or trade for anythin" of value.—F. M., 1522 Norwood Ave., Toledo, Ohic!

SACRIFICE—A Curtiss type biplane, flown by onj of America's most famous aviators, with 8 cyl. Hall Scott 60 II. P. motor, all in Ar condition, for $1,35! cash, suhject to demonstration to bona-fide purchase! Shipping boxes, propeller, crates, completely equippel for the road. Free instruction in flight to purchasa at well-known flying field. The best bargain of til season. Opportunity knocks but once at every manl door. Address "Sacrifice," care of AERONAUTICS) 122 E. 25th St., New York.

EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY is offered by e:j pert to finance building of patented Cross-Couutiy anl Water Aeroplane of the future which possesses star] ling new features. Self-balancing, impossible to co lapse. Can be built with one or more motors. Ern:| Ebbinghaus, 105 East 84th St., New York.

NATIONAL AVIATION FUND NO^ $1,270,000.

Paris, Feb. 1.—The national subscription for til French aerial war fleet amounts to $1,270,000, accorJ ing to announcement made by Senator Reymom president of the National Aviation Committee, ail the fund will enable the committee to present to tl| army 210 aeroplanes, pay for the training of I expert pilots and erect 70 aeroplane sheds. It is i| tended to establish a complete system of militaii air ports throughout the country, so that militai aeroplane pilots will be able to acquire an intimaj knowledge of every part of France without ever beii< out of reach of shelter and needful supplies.

San Francisco and the Hall-Scott concern are di veloping an intrepid flock of flying men. Roy Franc'l Otto Rybitzki, XV. II. Plakley, Alfred Barrett, Chart Pryant, R. G. Fowler, Silas Christofferson, and 1 brother Harry; and, until quite recently when 1 family ohjected, Adolph Sutro.

Each Sunday, when the weather is favorable, ai that has been every Sunday since the beginning the enterprise two months ago. a flying tournamei so to say, has been held on the Exposition grouiu

George A. Gray, a Wright flyer of more or lei repute, is reputed to have looped the loop at Atlanl Peach. Fla., on January 25. Strange to say, accoJ ing to the newspaper reports, he flew his "aeropla( upside down."

NEW BENOIST AIR BOAT.

The new Penoist Airboat "45" has been received . St. Petersburg and put in active service on the i\ Petersburg-Tampa line. This boat is about the sail as the previous models, with several refinements ai a new wing that has demonstrated much greater e] ciency over the old one. It created much surpril around the areo camp when Janmis got ready to maj his regular trip to Tampa after trying out the n' chine, and announced that he would take two passed gers instead of one. Two passengers were quicll loaded in and Janmis had no trouble at all in g<] ting these out of the water and made the round trl on schedule time. Each of the two trips were ma that day; several special flights were made and t machine tallied up over 100 miles for the first dl equipped with but a 75-h.p. Roberts motor.

It will be noticed by examination that it has null cleaner lines than the older 'plane; motor much moj accessible; chain guards and back part of the motl exposed, making it much more efficient for the radl tion of heat, while the hood has a new curve, will eliminates a lot of spray and_ the strong wind tli blows in the passengers' faces in the old boat.

It has a spread of 42 ft.; a gap of 6 ft. and chord of 5 ft. 2 in. The complete machine, readv fill up. weighs 1.250 lbs. On the regular Tampa triij with two passengers aboard, besides the aviator, tin take enough gasoline for the round trip and thj some for emergencies—about 22 gallons in all. T| gasoline and water cooling weighs about 150 lbs.

:w a class e>y stoic ilf

For your Flying-boat, or cross country flying,

m ...MAXIMOTOR...

will fill a long felt want for an ideal aero-

E. V. Ftitts flying at Oneonta, N. Y. in his 100 H-P ,• l .

MAXIMOTORED Biplane. nautic, power-plant.

Builders, as well as aviators, are MAXIMOTOR'S most ardent supporters.

For testimonials, and further particulars, just write to MAXIMOTORS

ARE BUILT IN FOUR DIFFERENT SIZES FROM 50 TO 150 H-P

DETROIT

1528 TEFFERSON AVENUE E.

The Thomas School

OF AVIATION

OFFERS SUPERIOR ADVANTAGES

Address, Thomas Bros. Aeroplane Co. BATH, N. Y.

We make an extra high grade plated finish wire for aviators' use.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ADDRESS

John A. Roebling's Sons Co.

TRENTON, N. J.

Broadway Central

CORNER THIRD STREET

In the Heart of New York

Special attention given to Ladies unescorted

SPECIAL RATES FOR SUMMER

OUR TABLE is the foundation of our enormous business

AMERICAN PLAN EUROPEAN PLAN

$2.50 upwards $1.00 upwards

Send for Large Colored Map and Guide of New York, FREE

TILLY HAYNES

Proprietor

DANIEL C. WEBB. Manager Formerly of Charleston. S. C.

The Only New York Hotel Featuring

AMERICAN PLAN

Excellent Food Good Service

Moderate Prices

In answering advertisements please mention this magazine.

PATENTS

SECURED or FEE RETURNED VICTOR J. EVANS & COMPANY Main offices: ™-J&^g-Sgg?g£-w'

Send sketch or model for FREE search of Patent Office record. Write for our Guide Books and What to Invent with valuable List of Inventions Wanted sent Free. Send for our special list of piizes ottered for Aeroplanes. $600,000 Offered in Prizes for Airships. We are Experts in Aeronautics and have a special Aeronautical Department. Copies of Patents in Airships, 10cents each.

V\JVS 1 you are ;nter. ested in a reliable, efficiint sr ceconcrricf I rower plant, list is the enly kind we build. Four sizes. Reasonable Prices

Kemp Machine Works Muncie, Ind.

PATENTS

C. I_. PARKER

Ex-member Ex.mining Corps, U. S. P.lent Otfie. Attorney-at-Law and Solicitor of Patents

American and foreign patents seeured promptly and with special regard to the eomplete legal protection ol the invention. Handbook for inventors sent upon request. 30 McGill Bid*. WASHINGTON. D. C.

Special grades of Bamboo for Aeronautic Work. Reed, Rattan and Split Bamboo for models. Tonka Rattan for Skids l!4 diameter and under any length.

J. DELTOUR, Inc. ^tllitT^

Published Semi-Monthly by Aeronautics Press

122 E. 25th St.. New York Cable : AERONAUTIC, New York

•Phones j ^3 \ Madison Sq. A V JONES, Pres't ERNEST L. JONES, Treas'r-Sec'y

ERNEST t. JONES, Editor M. B. SELLERS, Technical Editor

HARRY SCHULTZ, Model Editor

SUBSCRIPTION RATES

United States, $3.00 Foreign, $3.50

No. 79

FEBRUARY 14, 1914 Vol. XIV, No. 3

Entered as second-class matter September 22, 19(18, at the Post-office, New York, under the Act of March 3, 1819.

<J AERONAUTICS is issued on the 15th and 30th of each Month. All copy must be received 6 days before date of publication. If proof is to be shown, allowance must be made for mailing.

*llvlake all checks or money orders free of exchange and payable to AERONAUTICS. Do not send currency. No foreign stamps accepted.

The

Wright

Company

(The

Wright

Patents)

We are now prepared to make prompt deliveries of our various types for

EXHIBITION FLYING

The United States Courts have upheld the Wright Patents, declaring the Curtiss, Farman, Bleriot and similar machines to be infringements, and permanently enjoining the use of all such infringing machines.

The season of 1914 will be a iiros/ierous one for

WRIGHT FLYERS

Prices and information upon request

The Wright Company

DAYTON, OHIO New York Office: 11 Pine St.

This page contracted for by

A. LEO STEVENS

FOR NEXT ISSUE

WE ARE HEADQUARTERS)

for model aeroplanes, accessories and supplies I Very complete eatalog free on request I nr. j:__n:..... in- n.

Wading River Mfg. Co.

Wading River. N. Y.

MODELS

CHURMV

Two- and Three-Bladed

PROPELLERSSL0ANE AER0PLANE co''1733 Broadway.NewYork

The Standard American Propeller. Furnished to the Governments of the United States, Mexico, Guatemala, etc., and the leading American Aviators.

Tbree-bladed type for flying boats and tractors

Actual tests have proven the new three-bladed types to be

20 per cent, more efficient than any other.

Hare you our new iirice list .' Write for it and save money

In answering advertisements please mention this magazine.


PDF Document